“Eviscerated” father threatened with bankruptcy after construction permit error on scaffolding – .

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“Eviscerated” father threatened with bankruptcy after construction permit error on scaffolding – .


A father goes bankrupt after mistakenly building a scaffolding site without a building permit.
Jamie Fuller thought he had all the clearances he needed to top 5,000 tons of hardcore on a court.

The 33-year-old father-of-three did not know he needed to submit an urban planning application.

Now Jamie, from Llanelli, Wales, faces a bill of £ 85,000 after being ordered to remove the scaffolding site, reports WalesOnline.

He says he has already spent around £ 30,000 on the project and believes bankruptcy is likely.

Jamie said, “I’m disgusted. This jeopardizes the future of my three children. I want to give them the best possible life. This will leave me obligated to sign.








Jamie had a permit from Natural Resources Wales, but he did not have a building permit
(

Image:

John Myers)

“I feel like I’m going to be stuck in a council house for the rest of my life and be left with nothing. For four years I started my scaffolding business, working long hours and weekends. I feel like that was it. for nothing. “

Jamie, who employs two scaffolders, purchased the abandoned land from his grandfather Gerald in June 2020 as the base for his business.

He said: “I thought it was paid, it’s up to me, no one can tell me what to do and I’m not afraid of having to leave.

“It was awesome. My plan was to build a house there in the future. It was my dream.








Jamie is now being told he has to take it all off and it will cost him £ 85,000
(

Image:

John Myers)

“The original access point to the site was the same as my grandfather’s house. I didn’t want to cause him any problems or depreciate the value of his property by sharing access, so I created a new hotspot.

Jamie has asked Natural Resources Wales (NRW) for the right to unconditional tip to level the playing field, which he has described as a disused ‘flytipping hot spot’ for decades.

He said: “The land was overgrown and I cut it down. It was a bog, a hell of a mess, with a little stream running down the side. There were tires and refrigerators and dead animals and rats. You name him, he was there. I must have taken 100 dumped tires. ”








Jamie is worried that he will go bankrupt
(

Image:

John Myers)

NRW granted an exemption for the father to use waste in construction.

He started rocking some hardcore and rubble to build a driveway and hard floor for the scaffolding yard, with a layer of crushed stone on top to make it “tidy.”

In September 2020, the access was in place but Jamie was still laying the surface of the site.

He says he was then visited by representatives of Carmarthenshire Council and NRW.

He said: “It freaked me out a bit. They said their biggest concern was access. I asked what I should do. They said I needed a building permit for access but didn’t mention anything about [tipping for the surface of the yard].








Jamie bought the abandoned land from his grandfather Gerald in June 2020 as a base for his business
(

Image:

John Myers)

“I had trucks coming in and dumping rubble at the time. They could see we were leaving a tip that day and didn’t say anything about it. There was no shutdown notice for the changeover. “

He filed for retrospective planning for access, but says he didn’t hear council until March 2021 tell them to block access, remove scaffolding and get rid of everything else. .

Jamie appealed but was rejected.

He said: “The price for removing all the hardcore will be around £ 85,000. Companies are afraid of damaging the road, so I have a hard time finding someone to remove it.








Jamie is now worried about how this affects his children’s future
(

Image:

John Myers)

“The Planning Inspectorate said it could not take into account personal circumstances because I broke the Planning Law of which I was not aware. I’m afraid I have bailiffs at my door. If this happens I will have to sell all my equipment to pay for the move. “

He is now worried about how this affects the future of his children, Jake, eight, Thea, four, and Indi, two.

The Planning Inspectorate explained its decision to dismiss Jamie’s appeal, writing in its report that the development has “significantly altered and harmed the rural character and appearance of the immediate area.”

The report also raises security concerns. He indicates that the access is not perpendicular to the main road, adding: “Visibility in both directions from the access is limited and it is likely that vehicles exiting the site would have to exit onto the freeway to gain speed. visibility. “

NRW confirmed that its waste regulatory team had been in regular contact with Jamie “until the job became a planning issue” which was then led by the council.

Senior Waste Regulator David Ellar said: “Mr. Fuller did not have a permit for this work, he had registered an exemption with NRW.

“The exemptions relate to low-risk waste management operations that are exempt from the requirement of an environmental permit, but still require the holder to operate within specified limits and conditions. Registering an exemption does not remove the need to apply for other permits or authorizations. Waste exemptions must be registered with us prior to the start of the activity.

‘We canceled Mr Fuller’s exemption registration when the building permit was refused by the Carmarthenshire Council planning authority because the activity was not authorized. “

A council spokesperson added: “Before anyone starts any kind of development, we strongly recommend that they contact the local planning authority so that they can be informed of any permits that may be required. Having a permit from another organization to deposit waste on a site does not constitute a building permit.

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