Hundreds of people ordered to leave their homes on an Italian volcanic island to avoid suffocation – .

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Hundreds of people ordered to leave their homes on an Italian volcanic island to avoid suffocation – .



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Three hundred residents of the Italian island of Vulcano have been ordered to evacuate their homes due to a sudden increase in toxic gas emissions.

People are prohibited from sleeping in their homes as they could be suffocated by dangerously high levels of carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide.

The gases escape from fumaroles, holes in the ground and bubble through the mud baths and warm the sea around the island, making it a thermal paradise for tourists.

But CO2 levels have dropped from 80 tonnes to 480 tonnes over the past month, five times more than normal, meaning there is less oxygen in the air, causing cats to pass out in the air. the street and sick people.

Carbon dioxide levels around Vulcano (file photo) have fallen from 80 tonnes to 480 tonnes in the past month, five times higher than normal, meaning there is less oxygen in the ‘air. A “red zone” has been established around the port, which means that 300 people have to leave their homes for a month

The island is named after its own volcano, which has not erupted since 1888, and is part of the Aeolian archipelago which also includes Stromboli, which erupted dramatically in 2019.

“We have already seen how deadly accumulations of CO2 can be,” said Carlo Doglioni, director of the Italian National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology.

The island is named after its own volcano, which has not erupted since 1888, and is part of the Aeolian archipelago which also includes Stromboli, which erupted dramatically in 2019.

Vulcano Mayor Marco Giorgianni has ordered the evacuation of the port area, designating it as a “red zone” where residents will be barred from staying between 11pm and 6am.

“The unconsciousness of sleep would not allow them to detect the risks,” said the mayor.

He also designated a “yellow zone” where people are allowed to stay in their homes but can only sleep on the upper floors.

The ordinance also bans all non-resident visitors and tourists to the island for one month.

Those who were evacuated from their homes will be accommodated elsewhere on the island, which is home to around 1,000 people in total.

In a report released last week, the Italian National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology said carbon dioxide levels were “abnormally high” around the volcano’s crater.

Local media reported that several families had already left their homes at the end of October due to the gas, after the civil protection agency issued an alert on “significant” changes in volcanic parameters.

Several residents reported that the shows made their pets sick.

“One day, I suddenly noticed that my 10 cats were lying on the ground as if they had passed out,” Stefania Lombardo told the Italian daily La Repubblica, adding: “I was not feeling well either, I had trouble breathing. “

Lombardo continued, “They told me it was just a panic attack and then the doctors confirmed that the cause of the illness was the exhalation of gas from the crater. “

Marco Pistolesi, professor of volcanology at the University of Pisa, said the increase in emissions had “never been observed before”.

The volcano's crater is surrounded by smoke rising from the fumaroles in this file photo

The volcano’s crater is surrounded by smoke rising from the fumaroles in this file photo

The municipality will provide grants to help those forced to find another place to stay, but life on the island will continue as usual during the day, Giorgianni said.

Angela Borgia, who runs a restaurant in the port area, said even if islanders were concerned about gas, it would be difficult to move the elderly and sick overnight.

“We also understand that it is for our own safety and we accept it,” she said.

The Romans believed that the island was the chimney of their fire god, Vulcan, who allegedly worked as a blacksmith under the Earth.

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