COVID vaccines are coming for children aged 5 to 11. Here’s what New Yorkers need to know. – .

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COVID vaccines are coming for children aged 5 to 11. Here’s what New Yorkers need to know. – .


Children between the ages of 5 and 11 will likely be able to get the COVID-19 vaccine next month after a Food and Drug Administration advisory committee voted in favor of authorizing the Pfizer vaccine for all children in this country. age group Tuesday. Moderna also released preliminary data on the performance of its vaccine in young children this week and announced plans to seek similar clearance.
For some New York parents, the shots can’t come soon enough.

“We’re keeping a close eye, hoping it would be approved for their age group,” said Robert Currie, a resident of Fort Greene, Brooklyn, whose children are 6 and 9 years old. Currie is from Scotland and said not being able to get his children vaccinated made him more worried about traveling abroad with his family. Children 12 and over have been eligible since May.

“It added another complicating factor to something that was already complicated,” he said.

Others are more hesitant – in some cases even if they themselves have been vaccinated.

“It’s a tough decision,” said Liscole Young, whose 6-year-old twins attend Elijah G. Stroud Elementary School in Crown Heights. She said her entire family, including her 15-year-old daughter, had been vaccinated against the coronavirus, except for the twins. She wants to protect them, but has become skeptical of the effectiveness of vaccines due to reports of groundbreaking cases – where people catch the virus despite inoculation.

“I have a feeling they are going to get it,” she said. “But if they start tomorrow, I won’t be the first in line. I might not even be the 10th person online.

Even enthusiastic parents might still have questions about the results of Pfizer’s clinical trial, where injections will be available in New York City, and whether doses will be needed to go to school. The FDA committee itself had long deliberations on whether the injections should be for all children or only for those with pre-existing conditions. WNYC / Gothamist has reached out to vaccine experts, pediatricians and city and state health officials for their advice.

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