Breakthrough symptoms under the radar – .

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Breakthrough symptoms under the radar – .


A mild cough, a fleeting headache, or a mild sore throat may be the only sign that the virus that causes COVID-19 has infected a person fully vaccinated against the disease.

“Most people who are vaccinated and infected experience (symptoms) like a cold,” Dr. Joss Reimer, medical lead for the Manitoba COVID-19 Vaccine Task Force, said on Wednesday.

“They don’t feel well for a few days, have a sore throat, maybe a fever,” she said. “A lot of them have very few symptoms. ”

This was the case for Darren Ridgley, a father of two, when he tested positive for the new coronavirus in mid-September.

Following exposure at the daycare before Labor Day weekend, her son had a few sniffles, which triggered the test which eventually came back positive.

“They feel bad for a few days, have a sore throat, maybe a fever. Many of them have very few symptoms. “
– Dr. Joss Reimer, medical lead for the Manitoba COVID-19 Vaccine Task Force

Ridgley and his wife – who were both fully vaccinated – tested negative at the time, while their young daughter also tested positive for the virus.

“It’s a scary thing… because on the one hand, you know COVID-19 doesn’t hit kids as hard, but you also know the stories where it hit them hard. So you worry about them. Said Ridgley, who works for the Free press as a reviewer.

Ridgley and his wife both wore face masks in their home, kept their distance as much as possible, and sanitized their home frequently, “but there’s not much you can do.”

“You have a five-year-old who has had the virus he’s been hearing about since he was three and he’s scared. How don’t you give her a hug? Ridgley said.

At the end of the two-week isolation period – the children did not have a fever and appeared to have returned to normal after four days – Ridgley said public health cleared him and his wife, to return to work and to the community, based on immunization status and because they were symptom-free.

However, to be very careful, he still opted for a COVID-19 swab. After three days, the result came back positive.

“You have a five-year-old who has had the virus he’s been hearing about since he was three and he’s scared. How don’t you give her a hug?
– Darren Ridgley, father of two, who tested positive for coronavirus in mid-September

Ridgley said when public health asked about the symptoms, he struggled to identify which ones are worth mentioning. However, eight days earlier, he had a very mild cough that lasted for an evening.

“Fortunately, I was fine. I didn’t feel anything. No temperature, no breathing problems, and now finally, five weeks later, we’re all free again, ”Ridgley said.

Tuesday the Free press requested statistics from Manitoba Public Health on the types of symptoms experienced by people fully vaccinated, including the number of people who have not reported any and the number of people infected through household contacts. These details were not released on Wednesday.

According to the province, there were 271 active cases of COVID-19 in Manitoba among those fully vaccinated as of Wednesday, or about 32% of all active cases. Since the vaccine became available, only 0.11% of all fully vaccinated Manitobans have contracted COVID-19.

However, as the proportion of fully vaccinated Manitobans increases, they can be expected to account for more infections, Reimer said.

As of Wednesday, nearly 70% of the population was considered fully vaccinated, but accounted for only 32% of active cases. Unvaccinated and partially vaccinated Manitobans made up 31.1 percent of the population, but 69 percent of infections.

“Fortunately, I was fine. I didn’t feel anything. No temperature, no breathing problems, and now finally, about five weeks later, we’re all free again. “
– Darren Ridgley

“We really encourage people to look at the big picture and also consider that when we look at hospital admissions, that number goes down, and when we look at ICU admissions, hardly anyone is fully vaccinated who is. ends up being admitted to intensive care, ”Reimer mentioned.

University of Manitoba virologist Jason Kindrachuk said that by looking at the number of fully vaccinated people who test positive, it is also important to determine whether the virus is spreading widely in the community.

“If there is high community transmission, what it certainly tells us immediately is that there are more viruses around and more opportunities for us to be exposed,” he said. .

“Vaccination concerns a community and a population, so the higher the number of people vaccinated in that population, the less capacity and opportunity there is for the virus to be transmitted,” he said.

“We have to think about this by moving away from being vaccinated individuals and thinking about the importance of population. ”

After coming into contact with COVID-19 and experiencing the protection the vaccine provides, Ridgley said he hopes children under 12 – like his own – will soon be able to benefit from the vaccination.

“Most kids are lucky that they don’t get too sick from this thing, but that’s not always the case,” he said. “And if we can create that same certainty for them, I totally agree. ”

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