Vigil finale leaves BBC viewers ‘stressed’ and ‘claustrophobic’ – .

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Vigil finale leaves BBC viewers ‘stressed’ and ‘claustrophobic’ – .


BBC One’s hit series Vigil left viewers on the edge of their seats in Sunday night’s finale, as lead actress Suranne Jones found herself in a perilous scenario.

Suranne plays DCI Amy Silva in the series – a cop investigating when a Scottish fishing trawler goes missing, while a murder takes place aboard a nuclear submarine elsewhere.

DCI Silva found herself trapped in a torpedo tube as it filled with water during the tense climax, slowly filling with water.

Drama! BBC One’s hit series Vigil left viewers on the edge of their seats in Sunday night’s finale, as lead actress Suranne Jones found herself in a perilous scenario

Knocking, screaming and struggling to breathe, Silva was seen moving in and out of consciousness, passing out.

Fans of the show were seized with many taking to Twitter to comment on the “tense,” “stressful” and “claustrophobic” streak on screen.

“I’ve never felt so claustrophobic as I watch #Vigil,” one posted.

Another wrote: “I don’t know why I’m doing this to myself and watching #Vigil gives me the worst anxiety. “

Tense! Suranne plays DCI Amy Silva in the series – a cop investigating when a Scottish fishing trawler goes missing, while murder takes place aboard a nuclear submarine elsewhere

“This episode makes me hold my breath and stresses me out!” #vigil, ”another tweeted.

Viewers were gripped by Vigil, with his clever twists and unexplained death, all on a nuclear submarine.

The final was watched by an average overnight audience of 7.1 million viewers, with a share of 39.4 percent and a peak of 7.3 million viewers, as reported by the BBC on Monday.

The program’s production designer, Tom Sayer, had his work cut out for it to create an authentic setting for the drama.

The basic components of the set – based at the BBC studios in Dumbarton, Scotland – were created using marine grade MDF or plywood.

Behind the Scenes: With very little information to release due to the Royal Navy's strict security protocols, the program's production designer, Tom Sayer, had his work cut out for creating an authentic setting for the drama.

Behind the Scenes: With very little information to release due to the Royal Navy’s strict security protocols, the program’s production designer, Tom Sayer, had his work cut out for creating an authentic setting for the drama.

Process: Mr. Sayer had started by studying the design of old submariners to learn more about their inner workings.  His sketches were then turned into a compelling 100-foot-long set in three and a half months.

Process: Mr. Sayer had started by studying the design of old submariners to learn more about their inner workings. His sketches were then turned into a compelling 100-foot-long set in three and a half months.

There's another mystery at the heart of the BBC show - namely, what exactly a nuclear submarine is even supposed to look like

There is another mystery at the heart of the BBC show – namely, what exactly a nuclear submarine is even supposed to look like

It was then painted over or covered with sheets of laminate before being trimmed with aluminum strip to make it look as realistic as possible.

Sayer had started by studying the design of old submariners to learn more about their inner workings. His sketches were then turned into a compelling 100-foot-long set in three and a half months.

“We received advice on the layout and details from former submariners,” he told Radio Times.

“We would say to one of them, ‘Imagine if some guy left the missile bridge, where is he going on foot? What’s through that door? “Then we would ask another one to find out where the bomb store was in relation to the control room, so we could puzzle it out together. “

Vigil can be streamed on BBC iPlayer.

Submarine: The basic components of the set based at the BBC studios in Dumbarton, Scotland were created using marine grade MDF or plywood

Submarine: The basic components of the set – based at the BBC studios in Dumbarton, Scotland – were created using marine grade MDF or plywood

CHRISTOPHER STEVENS Reviews Weekend TV: Great Casting, Great Action But Vigil Is Torpedoed By His Dotted Plot

Evaluation:

You wouldn’t want the headache Shaun Evans must have this morning. Not only was he drunk like DS Morse but, on the other side in Vigil (BBC1), a dose of nerve gas made him lather.

The gas seeped into his pant leg, after he tore his hazmat suit while disposing of a canister of biological warfare chemicals aboard his nuclear submarine. Fortunately, heroic DCI policewoman Amy Silva (Suranne Jones) was able to give her a quick wash with bleach.

It seemed to cure the worst of his symptoms. Maybe Donald Trump, who advocated bleach injections as an antidote for Covid, was on to something.

DCI Amy was less fortunate. Already plagued by claustrophobic nightmares of drowning in confined spaces, she was pushed into a torpedo tube by a Russian spy, who then began to fill it with water.

She escaped by pounding the walls of her iron casket in Morse code. It’s Shaun Evans and Morse on BBC1, Shaun Evans in Morse on ITV.

What are the chances?

It wasn’t even the strangest coincidence of the evening. After an international incident that left American warships sink British trawlers, and all this stuff with the Kremlin secret agent, a Scottish peace activist tried to betray Vigil’s secrets to the Chinese. The UK was now at an impasse with the three superpowers. I don’t like our chances in World War III.

Vigil, who started off with an absurdly wacky premise, received more crackers every week. He couldn’t decide if it was a mysterious murder, a police proceeding, a political thriller, a war movie, or a disaster epic.

Woven into these contradictory genres was a double domestic drama. Amy was fighting for custody of her stepdaughter, while also longing for her lesbian lover, DS Kirsten (Rose Leslie), who was also her police partner.

Most of these events took place aboard the world’s largest submarine. At one point, a crew member complained to his captain that it would take him at least five minutes to sail the length of the vessel. By my calculations, that means HMS Vigil is about 800 meters long. . . bigger than most supertankers.

As ridiculous as it all is, I will miss Vigil. The cast, with Martin Compston, Paterson Joseph, Stephen Dillane and Adam James, was exceptional.

And while the submarine’s control room looked more like the Starship Enterprise’s cockpit, it was good to see a lavish production with a big budget for CGI and a flair for Hollywood action sets.

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