Timelapse shows construction of NASA’s supersonic plane set to fly next year – .

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Timelapse shows construction of NASA’s supersonic plane set to fly next year – .


NASA’s incredible supersonic aircraft dubbed the ‘Son of Concorde’ takes shape as it prepares for its first test flight next year.

The U.S. space agency shared a time-lapse video of the construction of the X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology (QueSST) for the craft, which takes place at Lockheed Martin Skunk Works in Palmdale, California.

The craft is designed to prevent a surprising sonic boom from being heard on the ground when cruising at Mach 1.4, or 925 miles per hour. For comparison, the speed of sound is 767 mph.

The short 43-second clip shows the development of the fuselage that houses the cockpit and the 29.5-foot-wide wing that contains the fuel systems and parts of the control systems.

At the end of the video, viewers see the tail assembly come together.

This section is constructed with heat resistant materials that protect the aircraft from the heat given off by the X-59’s GE F414 engine, which sits at the top of the craft.

This is one of the many useful design elements that ensure that the aircraft is shaped as desired to produce quieter noise for people below.

The tail is also nearing completion, designed with heat resistant materials, which will contain the engine compartment.

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NASA’s incredible supersonic aircraft that will travel faster than the speed of sound, which is 767 miles per hour, takes shape as it prepares for its first test flight next year

Jay Brandon, NASA chief engineer for the Low Boom Flight Demonstrator (LBFD), said in a statement, “We have now gone from a bunch of separate pieces sitting on different parts of the production floor to a plane. “

The X-59, first announced in 2018, is being made in collaboration with Lockheed Martin, who said the move “marks an important step in bringing supersonic land-based commercial travel a little closer to reality.”

NASA has awarded the U.S. aerospace and defense company a $ 247.5 million contract to build the X-59, which is expected to complete development this year and begin test flights in 2022.

The team started the adventure by creating laser projects of the aircraft’s wing, tail and fuselage to ensure their designs fit perfectly.

The US space agency shared a timelapse of the construction of the X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology (QueSST) for the craft dubbed the “Son of Concorde,” which takes place at Lockheed Martin Skunk Works in Palmdale, California.

The short clip shows the development of the fuselage that houses the cockpit and the 29.5-foot-wide wing that contains the fuel systems and parts of the control systems

The short clip shows the development of the fuselage that houses the cockpit and the 29.5-foot-wide wing that contains the fuel systems and parts of the control systems

As the project progressed, Lockheed and NASA began to put the pieces together, with Lockheed Martin’s program director David Richardson likening it to Legos.

“Extensive use of full-size features and pre-drilled mounting holes has dramatically reduced the time it takes to locate and install parts, especially to assemble large assemblies like this,” Richardson said in a statement. .

“It’s kind of like how Legos go together. We used the laser tracker to make sure everything is aligned to tech specs before we bolted everything down permanently.

The team celebrated when they confirmed that all of the hardware would fit into the real ship.

Dave Richwine, NASA LBFD Deputy Project Manager for Technology, said: “A step like this – seeing the plane come together as one unit – really invigorates and motivates the team. “

The tail is also nearing completion, designed with heat resistant materials, which will contain the engine compartment

The tail is also nearing completion, designed with heat resistant materials, which will contain the engine compartment

The front part of the craft, known as the fuselage, helps shape the entire shape of the supersonic craft.  This area will soon receive its 30-foot-long nose specially designed to minimize the resistance associated with shock from the craft traveling faster than the speed of sound.

The front part of the craft, known as the fuselage, helps shape the entire shape of the supersonic craft. This area will soon receive its 30-foot-long nose specially designed to minimize the resistance associated with shock from the craft traveling faster than the speed of sound.

The fuselage (the front part of the craft) helps to form the entire shape of the supersonic craft.

This part of the craft will soon get its 30-foot-long nose specially designed to minimize the resistance associated with shocks from the craft traveling faster than the speed of sound.

According to NASA, the cockpit will look more like a desk with its advanced technology that helps pilots navigate the powerful aircraft.

The cockpit will contain the forward-facing “window” of the External Vision System (XVS), which consists of two cameras mounted above and below the nose of the X-59.

The XVS serves as an additional safety aid to help the pilot maneuver safely in the air; it’s also the only system that will fit into the cockpit – other variants would project through the canopy, according to NASA.

The video also shows the wing, which NASA says is the “most recognizable part of the plane.”

Later this year, Lockheed Martin plans to ship the X-59 to a sister facility in Fort.  Worth, Texas, where ground testing will be performed to ensure the aircraft can withstand the loads and stresses that typically occur during flight

Later this year, Lockheed Martin plans to ship the X-59 to a sister facility in Fort. Worth, Texas, where ground testing will be performed to ensure the aircraft can withstand the loads and stresses that typically occur during flight

Nicknamed the

Nicknamed the “Son of the Concorde,” the craft is designed to prevent a surprising sonic boom from being heard on the ground when cruising at Mach 1.4 (925 mph)

Richwine explained that it was “the most complicated section and the first section of the X-59 that was made by Lockheed Martin”.

“The Lockheed Martin team used robotic machines with names that sound like pilot call signs – Mongoose and COBRA – to fabricate the wing before it mated to the tail and fuselage,” the said. NASA in the press release.

Mongoose is a tool capable of weaving together composite wing skins using ultraviolet light to bond the COBRA composite material – Combined operation: robotic automatic bolting and drilling – effectively created holes that allowed the team to attach the wing skins to the wing frame. “

Later this year, Lockheed Martin plans to ship the X-59 to a sister facility in Fort. Worth, Texas, where ground testing will be performed to ensure the aircraft can withstand the loads and stresses that typically occur during flight.

The team will also calibrate and test the fuel systems, sending the X-59 back to California for further testing before it hits the skies for its first test flight in 2022.

In 2024, NASA will fly the X-59 over several communities across the country to assess people's response to the thudding produced by the plane - if they hear anything at all.

In 2024, NASA will fly the X-59 over several communities across the country to assess people’s response to the thudding produced by the plane – if they hear anything at all.

If the test flight is successful, NASA plans to fly the X-59 over the test range at the agency’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in California in 2023 to prove it can thump quieter and can operate safely in the national airspace system.

In 2024, NASA will fly the X-59 over several communities across the country to assess people’s response to the thudding produced by the plane – if they hear anything.

“The data collected will be forwarded to the Federal Aviation Administration and the International Civil Aviation Organization for review as part of amending existing bans on supersonic flights over land,” according to the NASA.

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