DWP reveals the illnesses and conditions that qualify you for the Personal Independence Benefit – .

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DWP reveals the illnesses and conditions that qualify you for the Personal Independence Benefit – .


Benefits are available for those with a long term disability, poor health or terminal illness.
However, some wonder what illnesses and conditions qualify for the Personal Independence Payment or PIP, as it is often heard.

It should be noted that the rules surrounding the payment of the benefit have recently been changed so that applicants can access expedited financial support if their healthcare professional declares that they can die within 12 months, thus extending the current rule. six months.

READ MORE: DWP: Self-employed universal credit applicants face reduced benefits

But exactly what diseases and conditions are eligible for PIP?

The PIP is designed to replace the Disability Living Allowance, which is being phased out.

About 2.7 million people benefit from the PIP, of which a third on the highest amount.

Applying for a PIP involves being assessed to see what level of payment will be granted

Since the introduction of PIP in April 2013, a total of 5.9 million people have filed a complaint, according to the latest figures dating back to April 2021.

But exactly what diseases and conditions are eligible for PIP?

The PIP is designed to replace the Disability Living Allowance, which is being phased out.

About 2.7 million people benefit from the PIP, of which a third on the highest amount.

Applying for a PIP involves being assessed to see what level of payment will be granted

Since the introduction of PIP in April 2013, a total of 5.9 million people have applied, according to the latest figures dating back to April 2021.

This includes 3.9 million new claims entering the DWP system and an additional 2 million under reassessment when they are moved from the old Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP.

Of these, 2.9 million (53%) obtained the PIP. In 2.5 million (45%) of cases, the request was rejected, while the remaining requests were withdrawn.

The numbers show that 82 percent of new claims and 88 percent of DLA reassessment requests are recorded as having one of these five most common disabling conditions:

  • Psychiatric disorders (which include mixed anxiety and depressive disorders)
  • Musculoskeletal disease (general)
  • Musculoskeletal disease (regional)
  • Neurological disease
  • Breathing illness

The two most common conditions recorded in normal rule claims are psychiatric disorders (37% of claims) and musculoskeletal (general) (another 20% of claims).

The numbers show that people with neurological and musculoskeletal conditions are the most likely to get PIP after an assessment.

Among people with psychiatric disorders, only about half (52 percent) get PIP after an assessment, the lowest number of the five categories above. Others are told that they will not get any PIP.

In addition, the DWP recently revealed a list of 21 health issues that are most likely to be eligible for back pay of up to £ 12,000, after judges ruled that assessments had failed. not done correctly. Some applicants received lower PIP payments, while others were denied any PIP because their points were not high enough to qualify.

The amount of PIP awarded to an applicant may be reviewed upon reporting a change in circumstances, or at the end of the stipulated review period when the DWP first agreed to pay for the benefit.

During such a review, the amount a person receives may change. It can be increased, decreased, kept at the same level or stopped completely.

When circumstances change, most people find that the amount of PIP they receive increases. When their case is reviewed at the end of the review period, most people find that they end up getting the same amount.

The DWP said claimants with respiratory illness were the most likely to have their compensation increased or maintained at the same level (72 percent).

Claimants with psychiatric disorders were the most likely to have their compensation reduced or denied (41%).

But the DWP points out that the amount of PIP a person receives depends on the severity of your condition, rather than what it is.

To be eligible for PIP, you must have a physical or mental health problem or disability when you:

  • have had difficulty with daily life or moving around (or both) for three months
  • expect these difficulties to last for at least nine months

You will get the daily life portion of PIP if you need help more than half the time with things like:

  • prepare or eat food
  • wash, bathe and use the toilet
  • dressing and undressing
  • read and communicate
  • manage your medications or treatments
  • make decisions about money
  • engage with other people

The weekly rate for the daily living portion of the PIP is £ 60 or £ 89.60.

And you can get the mobility part of the PIP if you need help getting out or getting around.

The weekly rate for the mobility part of the PIP is £ 23.70 or £ 62.55.

People with a terminal illness benefit from the highest part of daily life, plus a part of mobility according to their specific needs.

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