specter of ghost shopping malls haunts Britain – .

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specter of ghost shopping malls haunts Britain – .


Devastating price of Covid lockdowns: specter of ghost malls haunts Britain as one in five stores forced to close

  • The situation is so bad that up to 70 shopping centers are at risk of being demolished or turned into offices, entertainment venues and housing
  • On average, one in five stores in malls is closed, study finds
  • The loss of Debenhams and the closures of big names like M&S left a hole

Purchases malls across the country are turning into “ghost malls” as record numbers close.

The loss of well-known names like Debenhams, along with closures of big names like Marks & Spencer and John Lewis, has left a hole in many centers.

The situation is so bad that up to 70 shopping centers are in danger of being demolished or turned into offices, entertainment venues and housing.

Malls across the country are turning into “ghost malls” as record numbers of stores close. Pictured: Riverside Mall in Shrewsbury

On average, one in five stores in malls is closed, the British Retail Consortium (BRC) and Local Data Company (LDC) found.

The LDC says at least 30 shopping centers in the UK are at least half empty, including five with more than 80% of stores vacant.

Centers already ready for redevelopment include Castlegate in Stockton, Riverside Center in Shrewsbury and Chilterns Center in High Wycombe.

Centers already ready for redevelopment include Castlegate in Stockton (pictured), Riverside Center in Shrewsbury and Chilterns Center in High Wycombe

The situation is so bad that up to 70 shopping centers are in danger of being demolished or turned into offices, entertainment venues and housing.  Pictured: The Chilterns center in High Wycombe is set to be redeveloped

The situation is so bad that up to 70 shopping centers are in danger of being demolished or turned into offices, entertainment venues and housing. Pictured: The Chilterns center in High Wycombe is set to be redeveloped

Helen Dickinson, CEO of BRC, said: “It’s no surprise that the number of closed stores continues to rise after retailers have been stranded for more than a year.

“The regional contrast is stark – the south of England has experienced lower vacancy rates, while the north, where disposable income is lower, continues to have a higher proportion of closed stores. “

The Daily Mail’s long-running Save Our High Streets campaign calls for a level playing field between traditional stores and their new rivals online.

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