Mass killer Anders Breivik tries to sell rights to film and book about his life for £ 7million – .

0
52
Mass killer Anders Breivik tries to sell rights to film and book about his life for £ 7million – .



|

Norwegian Anders Breivik, now 42, sent 20 letters to filmmakers begging them to tell his story on screen again

A mass murderer who killed 77 people tried to sell the rights to a film and a book about his life for £ 7million.

Norwegian Anders Breivik, now 42, sent 20 letters to filmmakers begging them to retell his story on screen and issued invitations to be interviewed in prison, according to The Sun on Sunday.

He said the killer, who is serving 21 years, wrote his own film script and biography before valuing the material at £ 7million ($ 10million).

A source told the publication: “Breivik’s offer for fame, money and freedom is an insult to its victims and their families.

“The same goes for the prison life he lives. Breivik lives a life of Riley in prison. He has never said forgiveness for his wicked crimes and he has no intention of doing so.

“He always wants to inspire others and he still believes in a fascist revolution. His plans to make money from the murders are a total insult to his victims and their families.

Breivik, who changed his name to Fjotolf Hansen, wrote his works from his three-room “cell” in Skien Prison.

It is complete with an office, a gym and a kitchen that gives him access to video games, television, and exercise.

In 2018, he lost his lawsuit claiming that his near isolation in prison violated a ban on inhuman or degrading treatment and violated a right to privacy and family life under the Convention. European Human Rights Commission.

Anti-Muslim far-right extremist, reportedly re-applying for parole, killed 77 in Norway’s worst peacetime atrocity in July 2011

Dressed in a police uniform, Breivik then traveled to the island of Utoya, about 40 kilometers away, where he opened fire on the annual summer camp of the youth wing of the Labor Party. from the left.

Dressed in a police uniform, Breivik then traveled to the island of Utoya, about 40 kilometers away, where he opened fire on the annual summer camp of the youth wing of the Labor Party. from the left.

The Oslo District Court agreed with him in a 2016 decision, but it was overturned by an appeals court in March 2017.

The Norwegian Supreme Court refused to hear his appeal in this case.

Norway said at the time that draconian measures, including hundreds of strip searches and no contact with other detainees, were justified for the unrepentant far-right extremist who could be attacked by other prisoners.

The anti-Muslim far-right extremist, who is reportedly re-applying for parole, killed 77 people in Norway’s worst peacetime atrocity in July 2011.

He killed eight people and injured dozens more after detonating a car bomb outside the seat of government in Oslo.

Dressed in a police uniform, Breivik then traveled to the island of Utoya, about 40 kilometers away, where he opened fire on the annual summer camp of the youth wing of the Labor Party. from the left.

Breivik, who changed his name to Fjotolf Hansen, has written his works since his

Breivik, who changed his name to Fjotolf Hansen, wrote his works from his three-room ‘cell’ in Skien prison (pictured)

Sixty-nine people were killed there, most of them teenagers, before he surrendered to the police.

His youngest victim was only 14 years old.

At the time of the attacks, Breivik claimed to be the commander of a secret Christian military order plotting an anti-Muslim revolution in Europe, but then described himself as a traditional neo-Nazi who prays to the Viking god Odin.

Criminals are prohibited from profiting from their crimes after conviction in many countries – including the UK – but Breivik believes Norwegian liberalism will give him the opportunity to do so.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here