A lesson in quiet courage from parents of school shooters – .

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A lesson in quiet courage from parents of school shooters – .


Raise a school shooter

Notation:

Murder, Mystery And My Family

Notation:

Few things could be more boring, you think, than watching a man unpack his weekly groceries. A complete stranger dusting off family photos in silence. Or a middle-aged woman wearing makeup.

But now imagine that these people have lived with an overwhelming burden of guilt and grief for decades.

Because they are the parents of murderers: some of their teenagers have committed multiple murders, entering school with guns and opening fire indiscriminately.

Suddenly, their parents’ mundane activities seem almost miraculous. You wonder how anyone can continue to find the strength for years to perform daily routines after such devastating events.

Raising A School Shooter (BBC4) consisted of wordless vignettes, showing Sue (pictured) in Colorado, mother of Columbine High shooter Dylan Klebold going on with her life

Raising A School Shooter (BBC4) largely consisted of these wordless vignettes, showing a mother and two fathers continuing their lives in the United States.

Sometimes they would stop and talk about the weight of regret and self-recrimination they carried.

Sometimes they remembered the horror of learning the atrocity committed by their own sons.

Most of the time, however, they just kept going. In Ohio, Jeff Williams visited the car wash. In 2001, her beloved boy Andy, who was 15, took a gun from the family gun cabinet and killed two classmates.

Jeff recalled his disbelief. When they were younger Andy had been “like my best friend”. We would do a lot of things together ”.

He knew his son was unhappy in school but Jeff, a single dad, didn’t know how to tell the boy about it.

In Ohio, Jeff Williams (pictured) visited the car wash.  In 2001, her beloved boy Andy, who was 15, took a gun from the family gun cabinet and killed two classmates.

In Ohio, Jeff Williams (pictured) visited the car wash. In 2001, her beloved boy Andy, who was 15, took a gun from the family gun cabinet and killed two classmates.

Forgiveness came instantly, and naturally, the moment he saw Andy cry at the police station, “The first time I remember telling him I loved him was that day. “

Another single dad, Clarence Elliot, lives for weekly phone calls to his son Nicholas in a Virginia jail.

Nicholas has been in jail since he shot and killed his teacher in 1988 – he is now serving a 114-year sentence.

Parole has been denied six times, but Clarence clings to the hope that he can one day catch the bus somewhere, anywhere with his son by his side.

The third and most eloquent parent was Sue in Colorado, mother of one of two Columbine High shooters, Dylan Klebold.

In 1999, 17-year-old Dylan and his friend Eric Harris slaughtered 12 classmates and a teacher before killing themselves.

Sue spoke fervently about her emotions, her initial reaction that she hoped her son was dead when she heard what he had done.

It took many months, she said, before she could believe the massacre was premeditated and not “a moment of madness.”

His need for public speaking was so intense that he contributed to the breakdown of his marriage.

There's more information in Murder, Mystery And My Family (BBC1), a story program in which two lawyers revisit a long-forgotten case.  Pictured: Jeremy Dein and Sasha Wass

There’s more information in Murder, Mystery And My Family (BBC1), a story program in which two lawyers revisit a long-forgotten case. Pictured: Jeremy Dein and Sasha Wass

It saddens her, but she can’t shut up: The best hope to avoid further shootings, she says, is to bond by talking about our feelings.

Such expressions of mourning and courage take time to permeate. The film’s technique of showing us people doing the most mundane things made us think about what they said.

There’s a lot more information in Murder, Mystery And My Family (BBC1), the daily history program in which two lawyers re-examine a long-forgotten case.

While details are provided in full, this is a more superficial treatment of the tragedy. It’s not helped by graphics that look like a 20-year-old video game.

This episode told the story of the “Manchester Martyrs”, three Irish rebels hanged in the 1860s for the murder of a policeman.

It was slightly interesting, but the gimmick of a “new trial” emphasizes how trivial the crimes are.

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