Residents of British Columbia will likely have a choice for second dose after AstraZeneca vaccine – fr

0
20
Residents of British Columbia will likely have a choice for second dose after AstraZeneca vaccine – fr


British Columbia health officials say residents who received the AstraZeneca vaccine for their first dose may have a choice of which vaccine they receive for their second.

Provincial health official Dr Bonnie Henry said Thursday there are many studies underway on the possibility of mixing COVID-19 vaccines.

“I know some people are concerned about using that term ‘mix and match’,” Henry said in a briefing. “And that’s something that’s important because there can be benefits to using two different types of vaccines.

“And one of the things we’re learning is that AstraZeneca vaccines seem to have a stronger cellular immune response – those cells that help us have long-term memory. So it may be beneficial to have one of each of the types of vaccines we currently have. “

The story continues under the ad

However, Henry said they did not yet know the answer to this. Studies are underway in British Columbia and a large study in the UK

They hope to have data from this research by the end of May.

Read more:

Fraser Health adds nine high transmission neighborhoods to priority vaccine list

Henry said officials were hoping to give the people who had the AstraZeneca drawn a choice for their second – whether it was AstraZeneca, Pfizer or Moderna.

“And we will be watching this very carefully.”


Click to play video: `` Symptoms of British Columbia Woman Who Developed Rare Blood Clot After AstraZeneca COVID-19 Vaccine ''







Symptoms of a BC woman who developed a rare blood clot after AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine


Symptoms of a BC woman who developed a rare blood clot after AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine

Read more:

Woman diagnosed with rare first blood clot disorder in British Columbia after AstraZeneca vaccine

The story continues under the ad

A British Columbia woman in her 40s has become the first person in the province to be diagnosed with a rare blood clot disorder after a dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine.

Henry said this was the first case of vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia, or VITT, that they have seen since the vaccination program began. The woman is stable and undergoing treatment in the Vancouver Coastal Health area.

Henry said it was very rare, but VITT was associated with the AstraZeneca vaccine. So far, research shows that it affects about one in 100,000 doses.

Show link »


© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.



LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here