Pfizer and Moderna vaccines reduce risk of getting sick with COVID-19 by 94% – fr

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Pfizer and Moderna vaccines reduce risk of getting sick with COVID-19 by 94% – fr


COVID-19 vaccines made by Pfizer and Moderna reduce the risk of contracting the virus by 94%, according to actual data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) largest study to date.

According to the new study released Friday, only six percent of COVID-19 cases among more than 1,800 health workers were in people fully vaccinated with one of two mRNA injections. None of the people included in the study had received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

The study was only designed to test whether vaccines prevent people from contracting symptomatic COVID-19, but the fact that only a small fraction of the group that tested positive was fully vaccinated suggests that the vaccines likely prevent the disease. infection and transmission – not just disease.

“This report provided the most compelling information to date that COVID-19 vaccines were working as expected in the real world,” CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said in a statement accompanying the new study.

“This study, added to the many studies that came before it, was essential for the CDC to change its recommendations for those who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19. ”

This was among the evidence the CDC relied on to update its advice for fully vaccinated Americans to say that those who have had all of their Covid shots can safely do without face masks. outdoors or indoors, with a few exceptions, including crowded places such as airplanes and buses.

According to the new CDC study, only six percent of COVID-19 cases among more than 1,800 health workers were in people fully vaccinated with one of two mRNA injections.

The study relied on a network of more than 500,000 health workers.

Its data was reduced to 1,843 participating nurses, doctors and hospital staff, all of whom were likely exposed to COVID-19 at work.

In the group, there were a total of 623 people who had tested positive for COVID-19 and had at least one symptom of the infection, and 1,220 people who had tested negative.

Only 40 of the 623 people who tested positive had been fully vaccinated.

In other words, only 3% of those who tested positive had been fully vaccinated, compared to 15% of those who tested negative.

This suggests (but does not prove) that fully vaccinated people are five times less likely to contract COVID-19, and results in a vaccine efficacy of 96%.

IN THE GREEN: CDC's updated infographics show fully vaccinated Americans can do just about anything safely without wearing masks

IN THE GREEN: CDC’s updated infographics show fully vaccinated Americans can do just about anything safely without wearing masks

However, the study did not include people who tested positive for the coronavirus but never showed symptoms, so it cannot prove that the vaccine prevents infection.

Another 64 people who tested positive had received a first dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine, as did 241 people who tested negative.

In total, this means that even a single dose was 82% effective against preventing symptomatic COVID-19.

People who tested negative were twice as likely to have received a first dose than those who tested positive and showed symptoms.

This is much better than what was found in Pfizer’s own clinical trial, in which a single dose appeared to prevent only 52% of symptomatic illnesses.

However, UK data revealed that a single shot prevented around 72% of illnesses 21 days later.

To date, more than 36% of Americans have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 and nearly 47% have received at least a first dose.

In other words, the risk of getting sick from COVID-19 has been reduced by 94% for more than 120 million people, and 155 million are 82% less likely to get sick.

Along with other studies, the new research was enough to convince the CDC that fully vaccinated people can go without a mask and be at minimal risk of getting sick from COVID-19.

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