Nearly unrecognizable Prince Charles in muddy tweeds and a flat cap as he poses hurdles at Sandringham –

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Nearly unrecognizable Prince Charles in muddy tweeds and a flat cap as he poses hurdles at Sandringham – fr


In an old battered tweed coat and cap, his knees covered in mud, Prince Charles is at his happiest.

He is pictured setting hedges at Queen’s Sandringham Estate in Norfolk, which he started converting three years ago to a fully organic farm.

Charles, who says a more holistic approach to farming would bring ecological and business benefits, shows his work in the latest edition of Country Life.

Prince Charles is pictured laying hedges at Queen’s Sandringham Estate in Norfolk, which he started converting three years ago to a fully organic farm.

Prince Charles is pictured in conversation with Natural England’s Emily Swan as they examine the species host that earned Sandringham its designation as a Site of Significance

Charles, who says a more holistic approach to farming would bring ecological and business benefits, shows his work in the latest edition of Country Life

Charles, who says a more holistic approach to farming would bring ecological and business benefits, shows his work in the latest edition of Country Life

“It always seemed somewhat logical to adopt an agricultural system that works with nature and not against it,” he told the magazine.

“Globally, it is becoming increasingly clear to me that the very future of humanity may depend to a large extent on a general shift towards more sustainable agricultural practices.

The prince warns that, just like the overuse of antibiotics in humans, artificial fertilizers derived from fossil fuels and chemical pesticides have a catastrophic effect on the soil.

For 24 years about ten percent of Sandringham has been managed organically, but he’s now working on converting the rest of the land, as well as getting some farmers to follow suit.

Picture Beekeeper Leigh Goodsell takes care of his bees, which have roamed the estate since organic conversion began three years ago.  Chemical-free Sandringham fields, many of which are filled with clover and phacelle, offer a treat for bees

Picture Beekeeper Leigh Goodsell takes care of his bees, which have roamed the estate since organic conversion began three years ago. Chemical-free Sandringham fields, many of which are filled with clover and phacelle, offer a treat for bees

The prince warns that, just like the overuse of antibiotics in humans, artificial fertilizers derived from fossil fuels and chemical pesticides have a catastrophic effect on the soil.  Pictured: Harvest at Sandringham

The prince warns that, just like the overuse of antibiotics in humans, artificial fertilizers derived from fossil fuels and chemical pesticides have a catastrophic effect on the soil. Pictured: Harvest at Sandringham

Charles took great pleasure in seeing the insects thrive thanks to the removal of pesticides and inorganic sprays, and helped recreate hedges, wildlife corridors, nesting boxes, beetle beds and field margins. .

“As a patron of the Hedgelaying Society and a practicing hedge trimmer, I am always proud to maintain a traditional craftsmanship of timeless importance,” he says.

He introduced rare breeds, including hardy Aberfield sheep, which are an important part of the ecosystem, eating weeds and fertilizing the soil with their droppings.

Charles took great pleasure in seeing the insects thrive through the removal of pesticides and inorganic sprays, and helped recreate hedges, wildlife corridors, birdhouses, beetle schools and margins. of fields.

Charles took great pleasure in seeing the insects thrive through the removal of pesticides and inorganic sprays, and helped recreate hedges, wildlife corridors, birdhouses, beetle schools and margins. of fields.

For 24 years about ten percent of Sandringham has been managed organically, but he's now working on converting the rest of the land, as well as getting some farmers to follow suit.

For 24 years about ten percent of Sandringham has been managed organically, but he’s now working on converting the rest of the land, as well as getting some farmers to follow suit.

“It’s a pleasure to see native British breeds grazing again,” he says.

‘Sandringham is no different from all UK farms which, recognizing that a sustainable business and a profitable business are one and the same, will need to be increasingly adaptable if they are to find a way to thrive in the changing climate. “

Meanwhile, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited an anti-violence project near Edinburgh during their tour of Scotland yesterday.

Kate tried her hand at being a music producer in the center studio, only for William to joke, “What is this?” It looked like a cat!

The full article on Charles is in the latest issue of Country Life magazine, on sale now

Meanwhile, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited an anti-violence project near Edinburgh during their tour of Scotland yesterday.  Kate tried her hand at being a music producer in the center studio, only for William to joke,

Meanwhile, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited an anti-violence project near Edinburgh during their tour of Scotland yesterday. Kate tried her hand at being a music producer in the center studio, only for William to joke, “What is this?” It looked like a cat!

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