Government reveals plans for weekly food waste collection across England from 2023 – fr

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Government reveals plans for weekly food waste collection across England from 2023 – fr



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In a step towards reducing landfill waste, every household in England will receive a weekly food waste collection by 2023, the UK government said today.

According to the proposals unveiled by ministers, every English household will receive a weekly food waste collection, which will help stop the build-up of smelly waste that attracts flies and pests.

The development will put an end to the “zip code lottery” – where different councils have their own rules about how often to collect waste.

Every household in England will receive a separate weekly food waste collection from 2023, the government said

THE CURRENT POSTAL CODES LOTTERY

Acumen Waste Management explains on its website: “Home recycling has long been inconsistent across the country.

“While in some places a wide range of items can be recycled, in others it is limited to a few types of material.

“In some areas all items can be placed in a bin to be taken away for recycling, while in others each must be disposed of in a separate container, improper sorting resulting in fines.

“Some local authorities collect the glass while others rely on the owners who recycle it themselves at their local bottle bank.

“Plastic recycling is also another area where there are strong disparities, with almost 8 million households in the country unable to recycle this type of product.

“Residents want more frequent recycling collections,” Environment Secretary George Eustice said.

“Our proposals will increase recycling rates and ensure that less waste goes to landfill. “

Ministers are also planning easier and more consistent recycling collections across the country, from glass to plastic and food waste.

In its consultation, released today, the government presented plans to facilitate recycling with a clear list of materials that all local authorities and waste management companies must collect.

Ministers are also planning to collect garden waste free of charge for every house, which could save households over £ 100million a year in green waste costs.

Currently, boards have the discretion to provide the service, which is typically billed in addition to council tax.

“Regular collection of food and garden waste will allow them to get rid of their waste faster at no additional cost to them,” said Mr. Eustice.

These measures will help the government meet its ambition to recycle at least 65 percent of municipal waste by 2035, with a maximum of 10 percent going to landfill.

The ministers also pledged to eliminate all preventable waste by 2050.

“We will end the confusion for millions of homes and businesses with different collections in different fields, helping households recycle more and send less waste to landfill,” the government said in a message.

Home recycling has long been inconsistent across the country. Most councils in London collect food waste, but not all, and do not collect it all from apartments or estates. Pictured are garbage and recycling bins in Tynemouth, North Tyneside

Additional funding and support will be provided to municipalities for their recycling collections, in part through government reform of the packaging sector.

This will allow packaging producers to cover the full net cost of managing their own packaging waste.

“This means that municipal taxpayers will not have to foot the tab and in turn will be able to reduce the amount of unnecessary packaging thrown away,” the government said.

“The proposals for consistent collections are part of the government’s broader agenda of major waste reforms that will boost recycling, intensify our war on plastic pollution and tackle waste. “

One potential problem with packaging producers covering their own costs is that they can rush to adopt alternative materials without fully assessing their impact on the environment, scientists warned last year.

HOW MUCH OF RECYCLING ENDS IN FILLING?

Every day, millions of us put a plastic bottle or cardboard container in the recycling bin – and we feel that we are doing our part for the environment.

But what we might not realize is that most plastics are never recycled at all, often ending up in landfills or incineration depots.

Of the 30 billion plastic bottles used by UK households each year, only 57% are currently recycled, with half going to landfill, half being thrown away.

Most plastics are never recycled at all, often ending up in landfills or incineration depots.  Supermarkets are full of plastic all the way to the gills, so I did my weekly groceries at a farmers market - something that may seem old-fashioned to millennials.

Most plastics are never recycled at all, often ending up in landfills or incineration depots. About 700,000 plastic bottles a day end up in the litter

About 700,000 plastic bottles a day end up in the litter.

This is largely due to the plastic wrapping around the non-recyclable bottles.

The UK throws away 2.5 billion “paper” cups every year, or 5,000 cups per minute.

Shockingly, less than 0.4% of these products are recycled.

Most cups are made of cardboard with a thin layer of plastic.

This used to have recycling issues, but can now be removed.

Five specialist recycling plants in the UK have the capacity to recycle all the mugs used in our high streets.

Ensuring that paper cups end up in these factories and are not thrown away incorrectly is one of the biggest issues facing paper container recycling.

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