Uncontrolled Covid hotspots could lead to third wave of virus, scientists warn

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Uncontrolled Covid hotspots could lead to third wave of virus, scientists warn


Unchecked Covid hotspots could lead to a third wave of the virus if the country reopens too quickly, scientists are warning.

Ministers have been criticized for ignoring their pledge to track “data, not dates” when the lockdown is lifted in accordance with Boris Johnson’s roadmap.

As it stands, six groups – or two households – can meet outside. Outdoor pubs and restaurants, as well as non-essential shops, will reopen on Monday.

Official figures indicate an average of 30.7 cases per 100,000 people.

But five local authority regions, Wakefield, Barnsley, Mansfield, Corby and Clackmannanshire, have three times that figure. Twenty-eight have at least double that.

Leeds University Faculty of Medicine associate professor Stephen Griffin said there were still ‘too many virus hotspots and insufficient attention was being paid to infection control that could spread from them ”.

Parts of West Yorkshire, the Black Country and other areas still have high case numbers, but people often cannot afford to self-isolate, Professor Griffin said, adding: ‘We have to tackle this problem urgently, otherwise the virus will come back. ”

Uncontrolled Covid hotspots could lead to third wave of viruses if country reopens too quickly, scientists warn (file image)

Professor Lawrence Young of Warwick School of Medicine told The Observer: “We need a properly funded system to quarantine those infected. We don’t have that and we could get into trouble pretty quickly.

Scientists say waiting for more people to get vaccinated would be a better approach.

Leeds University Faculty of Medicine associate professor Stephen Griffin said there were still `` far too many virus hotspots and insufficient attention was being paid to controlling the infections that could spread from them ''

Leeds University Faculty of Medicine associate professor Stephen Griffin said there were still `` far too many virus hotspots and insufficient attention was being paid to controlling the infections that could spread from them ''

Leeds University Faculty of Medicine associate professor Stephen Griffin said there were still ‘far too many virus hotspots and insufficient attention was being paid to infection control that could spread from them ”

Figures today revealed that more than 50% of England’s population are in areas with virtually no new cases of Covid, Boris Johnson is facing calls to lift the lockdown faster.

Some 4,307 regions – with a total population of 34.5 million – have had so few cases of Covid that Public Health England has not released its data for a month to protect the identities of the few people who test positive.

The neighborhoods – including parts of Devon and Cornwall – could have had two new cases, but likely had none in the week to April 4.

Meanwhile, 1,091 localities – with a population of 8.2 million – have not had data published since the end of February.

It follows that ministers plan to use vaccine passports as a short-term “bridge to freedom” before full herd immunity is reached in the fall.

According to the plans, all Covid-related restrictions would be relaxed as set out in Mr Johnson’s June 21 roadmap – but with passports allowing the return of mass public gatherings this summer.

This would include the return of capacity crowds for the start of the Premier League season in August.

Ministers plan to use vaccine passports as a short-term bridge to freedom before full herd immunity is reached in the fall - as plans would include the return of capacity crowds for the start of the season Premier League in August (stock image)

Ministers plan to use vaccine passports as a short-term bridge to freedom before full herd immunity is reached in the fall - as plans would include the return of capacity crowds for the start of the season Premier League in August (stock image)

Ministers plan to use vaccine passports as a short-term ‘bridge to freedom’ before full herd immunity is achieved in the fall – as plans would include returning capacity crowds for the start of the year. Premier League season in August (stock image)

‘Covid status certificates’, which would show whether the carrier had recently tested negative for the disease or had antibodies through a previous vaccination or infection, would be discontinued when a sufficiently large proportion of the community would be immune to the coronavirus to stop its spread.

A report last week argued that herd immunity had already been achieved, but the government’s cautious projections currently put that point at the end of October.

The use of passports is likely to be limited to public gatherings such as sporting events or theatrical productions, as the logic of their use for pubs and restaurants turns out to be formidable.

As one cabinet minister put it: “There can be benefits. But when you look at the practicalities of its implementation and the actual usefulness of implementing the system, it just isn’t worth it.

¿Covid Status Certificates¿ would show whether the carrier had recently tested negative for the disease or had antibodies either from a previous vaccination or infection (stock image)

¿Covid Status Certificates¿ would show whether the carrier had recently tested negative for the disease or had antibodies either from a previous vaccination or infection (stock image)

‘Covid Status Certificates’ would indicate whether the carrier had recently tested negative for the disease or had antibodies through a previous vaccination or infection (stock image)

Under the Prime Minister’s roadmap, large outdoor sports facilities would be allowed to operate at a maximum capacity of 25% from May 17, with a maximum of 10,000 spectators, while Wembley Stadium n ‘will only have a maximum capacity of 50% for the final stages. Euro 2020 matches in July. But passports could pave the way for events at full capacity.

The minister said: ‘Perhaps the choice we are considering is the opening day of the Premiership with 20,000 to 30,000 supporters without a Covid passport, or the start of the season with passports or some other system with 60,000.

“It’s obviously still a bit of a moving party, but based on current data, we believe we will achieve collective immunity during the month of October. So the question is: what can we do to deal with things like major events in the meantime?

A senior government source said: “It is impossible to know for sure, as there are so many moving parts in this pandemic. The uncertainty is over winter and the potential for a resurgence, but the data looks good for now.

Under the Prime Minister's roadmap, large outdoor sports facilities would be allowed to operate at a maximum capacity of 25% from May 17, with a maximum of 10,000 spectators (pictured: crowd at Glastonbury)

Under the Prime Minister's roadmap, large outdoor sports facilities would be allowed to operate at a maximum capacity of 25% from May 17, with a maximum of 10,000 spectators (pictured: crowd at Glastonbury)

Under the Prime Minister’s roadmap, large outdoor sports facilities would be allowed to operate at up to 25% capacity from May 17, with a maximum of 10,000 spectators (pictured: crowd at Glastonbury)

Modeling from University College London last week suggested that the proportion of the population protected from the coronavirus had reached 73.4%. The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies said 75 percent must be vaccinated for the UK to achieve herd immunity.

However, Health Secretary Matt Hancock – anxious not to slow the government’s rollout of the vaccine – downplayed the data, saying scientists told him the threshold had not yet been reached.

More than 40 Tory MPs voted against the idea, which means Mr Johnson could struggle to push the plan through Parliament. The ministers held talks with Israeli officials about importing technology for its Green Pass program, which allows those who have been vaccinated or have had Covid to enter places such as concert halls and concert halls. gymnasiums.

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