New York man tests positive for COVID two weeks after J&J vaccine

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A Brooklyn man found out on Monday that he had tested positive for coronavirus – more than two weeks after receiving the vaccine.

Matthew Sambolin, 39, told the Post that although he opted for Johnson & Johnson’s single-dose vaccine because it was “convenient,” he now wanted to get the shot from Pfizer or Moderna instead.

“The risk was there, I was ready to take it. Now I wish I had made a different decision, ”he said on a phone call from the spare bedroom of his home in Bath Beach, where he is currently in quarantine.

Sambolin said he was exhibiting minor symptoms, including a mild cough and fatigue.

While a rapid test he took on Saturday came back negative, a more accurate PCR test returned positive for COVID-19 on Sunday, according to documentation he provided.

“It was a shock,” Sambolin said upon learning of his positive test on Monday.

Director of operations for two local radio stations, Sambolin said he had “no ambivalence” about the COVID vaccine and looked forward to receiving his.

Matthew Sambolin was vaccinated in late March with the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, but later tested positive for COVID-19.
Matthew Sambolin was vaccinated in late March with the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, but later tested positive for COVID-19.
Matthieu sambolin

“I wanted to help build the immunity of the herd,” he said.

Sambolin also said he believes it is important to get the vaccine to help protect his young daughter Nora, who is almost two years old, and for the sake of the employees he leads.

He was vaccinated on March 24 at the NYPD Community Center in East New York, according to his vaccine card.

Sambolin wanted to receive the J&J jab because he wanted to get the shot when he traveled to Myrtle Beach, SC this weekend.

Wednesday – two weeks after being vaccinated, that’s when experts say he would be considered fully vaccinated – Sambolin believes he was exposed to the virus via a colleague who then tested positive for COVID.

Throughout the pandemic, Sambolin said he took all recommended precautions, including wearing a mask and social distancing, and had not used public transport for more than a year. , although he always goes to the office.

After finding out on Saturday that his colleague had caught the virus, Sambolin and his wife were tested at their local CityMD. His rapid test and PCR were negative.

Sambolin said he decided to tell his story after seeing other reports of people who received the jab from J&J and then contracted COVID, including the Post’s stories of a Brooklyn woman who was tested positive three weeks after her vaccine and a New Jersey man hospitalized. with the virus five weeks after its injection.

Matthew Sambolin, pictured here with his wife and baby daughter, was vaccinated in late March with the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, but later tested positive for COVID-19.
Matthew Sambolin, pictured here with his wife and baby daughter, was vaccinated in late March with the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, but later tested positive for COVID-19.
Matthieu sambolin

Sporadic cases of post-vaccine horror stories have surfaced on local news across the country. Health experts say that while people who are vaccinated can still catch the virus, the likelihood of this happening is much lower than in people who are not vaccinated.

“The vaccine does not necessarily prevent you from contracting COVID. It keeps you from being hospitalized or dying from it, ”Dr. Kris Bungay, a Manhattan primary care physician, told The Post. “That’s why we all have to be careful.”

“It was not common in clinical trials for patients to be symptomatic after being vaccinated,” Bungay added.

Moderna’s and Pfizer’s two-dose vaccines are 94% and 95% effective at preventing symptomatic coronavirus infections after two doses, respectively, according to the CDC. The single-dose J&J vaccine provides only 66% protection.

Sambolin said he hoped more people would take this data into account before getting vaccinated.

“I still think getting vaccinated is always the way to get herd immunity,” he said, but “I hope they really consider weighing the different efficacy.”

A box of Janssen COVID-19 vaccine doses from Johnson & Johnson
Sambolin said he was exhibiting minor symptoms, including a mild cough and fatigue.
Tom Williams / CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

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