NASA’s persistence and ingenuity take a selfie as the helicopter prepares for its first flight to Mars

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Ingenuity made the 239 million kilometer journey to Mars inside the belly of Perseverance until it fell to Martian dust soil on April 4.


As the Ingenuity helicopter prepares to make history by flying over the atmosphere of Mars, the Perseverance rover took a selfie of the pair to commemorate one of their last moments together.

NASA released the image on Wednesday, which is a collection of 62 individual photos taken by the rover as it looked at the small helicopter that stood 13 feet away.

Ingenuity is slated for its maiden flight on April 11, which will see the helicopter take off, hover in place and then return to land, and while the event will only last 90 seconds, it’s a feat that determines the fate of the mission.

It will be the first vehicle to fly to another planet, which NASA equates to the time of the Wright Brothers on Earth.

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As the Ingenuity helicopter prepares to make history by flying over the atmosphere of Mars, the Perseverance rover took a selfie of the pair to commemorate one of their last moments together.

Ingenuity made the 239 million kilometer journey to Mars inside the belly of Perseverance until it fell to Martian dust soil on April 4.

NASA announced the next day that the $ 85 million drone had survived its first night away from its travel companion, allowing the US space agency to move forward with its flight plans.

Ingenuity is expected to skyrocket on Sunday April 11 from a 33-by-33-foot building on Martian Earth that is the first airfield on another planet.

Once everything is gone, Perseverance will receive information from NASA to relay it to the helicopter.

Ingenuity made the 239 million kilometer journey to Mars inside the belly of Perseverance until it fell to Martian dust soil on April 4.

Ingenuity made the 239 million kilometer journey to Mars inside the belly of Perseverance until it fell to Martian dust soil on April 4.

Ingenuity is expected to skyrocket on Sunday April 11 from a 33-by-33-foot Martian building that is the first airfield on another planet.

Ingenuity is expected to skyrocket on Sunday April 11 from a 33-by-33-foot Martian building that is the first airfield on another planet.

Ingenuity is expected to skyrocket on Sunday April 11 from a 33-by-33-foot Martian building that is the first airfield on another planet.

However, a number of factors must be perfect for the event, including modeling local wind models informed by measurements taken by the Mars Environmental Dynamics Analyzer (MEDA) system onboard Perseverance.

Ingenuity will spin its rotors at 2,537 rpm and, if all final self-checks look good, take off.

The helicopter will climb about three feet per second (1 meter per second) and once it reaches three meters (10 feet), it will hover in place for 30 seconds before returning to the Martian surface.

One Twitter user shared the iconic moment between persistence and ingenuity as if the two were saying 'Until we meet again'

One Twitter user shared the iconic moment between persistence and ingenuity as if the two were saying 'Until we meet again'

One Twitter user shared the iconic moment between persistence and ingenuity as if the two were saying “Until we meet again”

This flight, although short, determines whether Ingenuity is able to complete the remainder of its mission.

NASA compares the first flight to another planet to that of the Wright brothers’ first flight to Earth.

Farah Alibay, Mars Helicopter integration manager for the Perseverance rover, said in a briefing last month: “I think about it mostly. [Ingenuity] as an experimental aircraft and it started with the Wright brothers who brought air mobility to travel here on earth in the same way we hope ingenuity on Mars.

And to commemorate the first flight to Earth, Ingenuity wears a part of the Wright Brothers’ plane.

The helicopter will climb about three feet per second (1 meter per second) and once it reaches three meters (10 feet), it will hover in place for 30 seconds before returning to the Martian surface.

The helicopter will climb about three feet per second (1 meter per second) and once it reaches three meters (10 feet), it will hover in place for 30 seconds before returning to the Martian surface.

The helicopter will climb about three feet per second (1 meter per second) and once it reaches three meters (10 feet), it will hover in place for 30 seconds before returning to the Martian surface.

Several hours after the first flight, Perseverance will feed Earth Ingenuity’s first set of engineering data and possibly images and video from the rover’s navigation cameras and Mastcam-Z, a pair of zoomable cameras.

“From the data transmitted the first night after the flight, the Ingenuity team expects to be able to determine if their first attempt at the flight to Mars was successful,” NASA said in a statement.

“The results of the flight tests will be discussed by the Ingenuity team at a press conference the same day. “

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