Labor MP Claudia Webbe ridiculed online after statement on 1884 ‘hidden’ map of African colonies

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Labor MP Claudia Webbe ridiculed online after statement on 1884 ‘hidden’ map of African colonies



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A Labor MP was left red-faced after claiming that a map of colonial Africa ‘had been hidden from you all your life’ – despite being taught in schools.

Claudia Webbe sparked a storm on Twitter when she posted a photo of the continent split between European empires in the 19th century.

The Leicester East MP, who was due to stand trial last month for allegedly threatening a woman, claimed the image had never been shown to anyone.

But social media users criticized the “ignorant” tweet, pointing out that the Rush for Africa is being taught in Key Stage Three high schools.

In the 18th and 19th centuries, European nations competed for strategic superiority over the continent by invading as fast as they could.

Britain and France quickly became the two main players in the race to conquer the region.

France captured most of West and North Africa, with British enclaves carved out in Nigeria and Egypt.

British influence spread from the Mediterranean to Cape Town in South Africa with the acquisition of Sudan, Kenya and Tanzania.

Other powers included Belgium, which took the Belgian Congo in the center of the continent, and Germany, which had colonies to the east and west.

Claudia Webbe sparked a storm on Twitter when she posted a photo of the continent split between European empires in the 19th century.

Ms Webbe had shared the map of African colonies last night after the Berlin conference in 1884.

She wrote: “This card has been hidden from you all your life. This is how they carved up Africa. “

Ms Webbe was quickly corrected for her “uneducated” comments, with historians and politicians taking the lead.

Dr Katherine Schofield, historian at King’s College London, wrote: “If you did not do colonialism in Africa directly, surely you studied the ‘rush for Africa’ when you studied the causes of the First World War? We were doing.’

David Wilson, PhD student on Classics at King’s College London, said: “Claudia Webbe, once a really terrible advisor to @IslingtonBC, now hangs in a silly way.

He added: “We have all been taught about the ‘rush for Africa’. As always, she wasn’t listening.

Coronation Street actor Charlie Lawson said: “It was not hidden from me. We have studied history.

Tory MP Ben Bradley said: “Hidden, no-one seen, deep in the pages of the National Curriculum for Key Stage 3 – taught in virtually every high school across the country. “

Dr Chris Parry, former Rear Admiral of the Royal Navy, trained at Oxford, wrote: “I did not hide. I had an education, for which I am grateful.

Sharing a map of Britain, he added: “By the way, that’s how the Angles, Jutes and Saxons carved up this country. What are you getting at? ‘

Save Our Status, a monument defense Twitter page, commented: “We keep hearing about the ‘hidden history’ of those who want to coat our statues with propaganda plaques.

“So the next time you hear that just remember that ridiculous tweet. There is no “hidden story”, just ignorance. ”

In the third key step, the national curriculum teaches students about colonization of the continent.

Collins’ The Victorian Empire Chapter 4 focuses on The Scramble for Africa between 1876 and 1914.

In the teacher’s guide to the book, it says that students should “study a map of Africa in 1900, with all the various European possessions shaded and labeled.”

He adds: “On this map, students could label information about the different stages of European colonization.

‘To reach the colony of Cape Town in 1814; invading Egypt in 1882; colonizing parts of West Africa by the United African Company, and parts of East Africa by the Imperial British East Africa Company, and so on.

Collins' The Victorian Empire Chapter 4 Focuses On The Scramble for Africa

Collins' The Victorian Empire Chapter 4 Focuses On The Scramble for Africa

Collins’ The Victorian Empire Chapter 4 Focuses On The Scramble for Africa

Britain waged several costly wars to secure its dominance on the continent, including the famous Anglo-Zulu War of 1879.

With the development of the machine gun, among other military innovations, the colonizing powers were easily able to take over.

In a single day of battle for Sudan, 10,800 Sudanese were killed, compared to 48 British soldiers.

British rule in Africa continued for over a hundred years, primarily using “indirect” puppet governments to quell rebellions.

Ms Webbe was due to stand trial on March 16 amid allegations she harassed a woman.

The 56-year-old has been accused of making a series of phone calls to Michelle Merritt and threatening her twice between September 2018 and April last year.

She pleaded not guilty on November 11 but was still suspended from the Labor Party until her hearing.

But the case at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on March 16 was adjourned because his lawyer Courtenay Griffiths QC was rushed to hospital.

Ms Webbe was elected in the December 2019 general election, taking over the seat previously held by Keith Vaz.

A Brief History of Colonization in Africa: From the “Rush for the Continent” to Decolonization

Africa has been a target for the most economically developed countries for centuries thanks to its wealth of natural resources and huge land mass.

The “rush for Africa”, a frantic period of colonization, took place in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Beginning with the Berlin Conference in 1884, European nations competed for strategic superiority over the continent by invading as fast as they could.

Britain and France quickly became the two main players in the race to conquer the continent.

British Lancers charging at Omdurman in 1898 as British troops took control of Sudan in the Mahdist War

British Lancers charging at Omdurman in 1898 as British troops took control of Sudan in the Mahdist War

British Lancers charging at Omdurman in 1898 as British troops took control of Sudan in the Mahdist War

A map of colonial Africa on the eve of the First World War.  At that time, European powers controlled 90% of the continent

A map of colonial Africa on the eve of the First World War.  At that time, European powers controlled 90% of the continent

A map of colonial Africa on the eve of the First World War. At that time, European powers controlled 90% of the continent

France captured most of West and North Africa, with British enclaves carved out in Nigeria and Egypt.

While Britain’s influence extended from the Mediterranean to Cape Town in South Africa with the acquisition of Sudan, Kenya and Tanzania.

Other powers at stake included Belgium, which took a large landmass known as the Belgian Congo in the center of the continent, and Germany, which had colonies to the east and west.

Britain waged several costly wars to secure its dominance on the continent, including the famous Anglo-Zulu War of 1879.

With the development of the machine gun, among other military innovations, the colonizing powers were easily able to take over.

In a single day of battle for Sudan, 10,800 Sudanese were killed, compared to 48 British soldiers.

British rule in Africa continued for over a hundred years, primarily using “indirect” puppet governments to quell rebellions.

Abyssinian infantry scramble for cover as Italian warplanes attack Ethiopia's Ogaden region during bitter warfare in 1935

Abyssinian infantry scramble for cover as Italian warplanes attack Ethiopia's Ogaden region during bitter warfare in 1935

Abyssinian infantry scramble for cover as Italian warplanes attack Ethiopia’s Ogaden region during bitter warfare in 1935

During this time, industrialists like Cecil Rhodes exploited Africa for its precious natural resources and expanded the borders of the empire.

After a long period of European domination, however, many African countries began to claim their independence at the dawn of the twentieth century.

Like India in 1947, many of Britain’s most valuable colonial possessions split from the empire in the 1950s and 1960s.

The last African country to gain independence from Great Britain was Zimbabwe in 1980.

The post-decolonization era was characterized by turmoil in many African countries.

Particularly in South Africa, where “apartheid” was in place until the early 1990s.

Figures like Nelson Mandela have been instrumental in leading the continent to a new era.

But many African countries remain plagued by corruption and snow covered by huge external debt repayments.

Former Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe lights independence lighthouse at crowded stadium

Former Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe lights independence lighthouse at crowded stadium

Former Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe lights independence lighthouse at crowded stadium

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