John Cleese issues mock apology for Monty Python after White Simpsons actor Hank Azaria says sorry

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Hank Azaria said he felt the need to apologize to



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John Cleese has apologized for making fun of the “white English people” in a mocking snipe at Simpsons actor Hank Azaria.

Mr. Azaria, who is Caucasian but has played the Indo-American character Apu since 1989, was the subject of controversy in 2017 following the release of a documentary.

He recently apologized to “every Indian” for voicing the clerk of Kwik-E-Mart, following an argument over how Apu’s portrayal impacted Indians in the United States .

In an interview with the Armchair Expert podcast, Mr. Azaria said the character contributed to “structural racism” and that he didn’t know better during the nearly 30 years he has voiced the character.

Mr. Azaria is the voice behind Moe Szyslak, Chief Wiggum Comic Book Guy, and many other characters.

Monty Python actor Mr. Cleese has now mocked his apology, saying sorry for “any distress” caused by portraying the white English.

He tweeted: “Not wishing to be left behind by Hank Azaria, I would like to apologize on behalf of Monty Python for all the many sketches we made making fun of white English people.

Monty Python actor John Cleese has now mocked Hank Azaria’s apology, saying sorry for “any distress” caused by portraying white English

Hank Azaria said he felt the need to apologize to

Apu, an Indian immigrant who runs Springfield's Kwik-E-Mart convenience store on the longtime show, first appeared on The Simpsons in 1990

Apu, an Indian immigrant who runs Springfield's Kwik-E-Mart convenience store on the longtime show, first appeared on The Simpsons in 1990

Hank Azaria said he felt the need to apologize to “every Indian in this country” for voicing the Apu Simpsons character.

“We are sorry for any distress we may have caused.

In another tweet on Wednesday night, Mr Cleese, while discussing the so-called ‘wake-up call’, said: ‘Started as a good idea -‘ let’s be nice to people ‘- and ended as a humorless, silly to the literal mind.

John Cleese apologized for mocking 'white English people' in mocking snipe at Simpsons actor Hank Azaria

John Cleese apologized for mocking 'white English people' in mocking snipe at Simpsons actor Hank Azaria

John Cleese apologizes for mocking ‘white English people’ in mocking snipe at Simpsons actor Hank Azaria

When Apu was called out for promoting racist stereotypes in the 2017 documentary The Problem With Apu, Mr. Azaria and the show’s creators appeared to ignore the critics.

Addressing the controversy in an episode the following year, Lisa Simpson asks “what can you do” when a character who had been loved for decades suddenly became politically incorrect.

However, Azaria, 54, has since said he listened to the concerns of Indo-Americans and realized that Apu was a problem.

“I needed to be quiet… to listen and learn. And it took a long time, ”he said.

“It wasn’t a two-week process: I needed a lot of education. ”

Apu, an Indian immigrant who runs Springfield’s Kwik-E-Mart convenience store on the longtime show, first appeared on The Simpsons in 1990.

Speaking about the wheelchair expert, Azaria said the character was created with good intentions.

“I really didn’t know any better. I did not think about it. I had no idea how much of a relative advantage I had received in this country as a white kid from Queens.

“Just because there were good intentions doesn’t mean there weren’t real negative consequences for what I’m responsible for. “

In 2017, Indo-American filmmaker Hari Kondabolu released The Problem With Apu, which argued that the character played on racist stereotypes of Indian immigrants.

Azaria declined requests to appear in the documentary.

But the Simpsons writers addressed the controversy directly on the show.

In the scene, Marge reads Lisa a bedtime story that was just a jumble of PC buzzwords.

It wasn't until after Hari Kondabolu's 2017 documentary The Problem With Apu, above, that Azaria says he acknowledged the character to be problematic.

It wasn't until after Hari Kondabolu's 2017 documentary The Problem With Apu, above, that Azaria says he acknowledged the character to be problematic.

It wasn’t until after Hari Kondabolu’s 2017 documentary The Problem With Apu, above, that Azaria says he acknowledged the character to be problematic.

Lisa looks directly at the camera, with a photo of Apu on the nightstand next to her, and says. “Something that started decades ago and was applauded and harmless is now politically incorrect. What can you do?’

The show’s response sparked a scathing reaction on social media.

That same year, Azaria appeared on The Stephen Colbert Show where he said he would be happy to stay away and let someone else express Apu.

He first told Armchair Expert that he wasn’t sure if he should stop making Apu, as he didn’t want to have an “knee jerk reaction” to what could have been just “17 hipsters at a microbrewery in Brooklyn. “. .

So he spent the next year talking with Indo-American groups to educate himself – “get the job done.”

“I needed a lot of education,” he said, attributing his experience with Alcoholics Anonymous to help with the process.

“If I hadn’t been sober I promise you it wouldn’t have taken a lot of wine to get me in my feelings one night and trigger a tweet that I felt justified in triggering.

A sort of defensive and fragile tweet. Boy, was I glad I had a system in place where I could watch this thing.

He also apologized to podcast co-host Monica Padman, who is Indo-American.

“I know you weren’t asking that, but it’s important. I apologize for helping to create this and having participated in it. Part of me feels like I have to go see all the Indians in this country and apologize.

“I realized that I had a date with fate with this thing for 31 years. ”

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