Teen Vogue Editor-in-Chief Alexi McCammond is pictured dressed as a Native American

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Teen Vogue Editor-in-Chief Alexi McCammond is pictured dressed as a Native American


Smiling for the camera in a Native American fancy dress outfit, it was the reporter who was forced to quit his post as editor of Teen Vogue in a row of errands.

Yesterday, it was claimed that Vogue editor-in-chief Dame Anna Wintour desperately tried to save her protégé Alexi McCammond even as staff led a revolt against her allegedly racist and homophobic tweets for which she had already apologized.

The Vogue editor-in-chief spent two weeks trying to “build support” for the journalist as the scandal swirled, insiders said.

Alexi McCammond (right) depicted as a Native American, she comes as she is already under fire in a series of allegedly racist and homophobic tweets

Yesterday, it was claimed that Vogue editor-in-chief Dame Anna Wintour (pictured) had desperately tried to save her protégé Alexi McCammond even as staff led a revolt against her allegedly racist and homophobic tweets she's been pushing for was already excused.

Yesterday, it was claimed that Vogue editor-in-chief Dame Anna Wintour (pictured) had desperately tried to save her protégé Alexi McCammond even as staff led a revolt against her allegedly racist and homophobic tweets she’s been pushing for was already excused.

As complaints mounted, Ms. McCammond was fortunate enough to meet with staff to “apologize and listen to their concerns,” The New York Times reported.

Her 2011 series of anti-Asian tweets were known in the upper echelons of Vogue, but they were blinded by a homophobic message and the photograph.

Insiders said they were not aware of the photo of a Halloween party in 2011 because it was deleted from their Twitter feed.

But The National Pulse found it and released it this week.

The 27-year-old stepped down as editor-in-chief of the online magazine on Thursday ahead of her first real day on the job after the row became public.

Previously, publisher Conde Nast reportedly tried to block offended Teen Vogue staff from speaking out and told them to keep reviews “in the family.”

The old tweets resurfaced after Miss McCammond was named the new editor-in-chief of Teen Vogue on March 5. In a 2011 tweet, when she was 17, she wrote about how she “Google searches how not to wake up with puffy Asian eyes.”

In another the same year, she blamed a “stupid Asian” teaching assistant for her failures in chemistry class.

Other tweets have used the terms “Asian”, “gay” and “gay” in derogatory ways.

Even in the midst of a revolt by the magazine’s staff, Dame Anna had supported Miss McCammond, it was reported.

The 71-year-old editor had tried to turn things around for the former Washington political reporter because she thought she was an “impressive” candidate, it was claimed.

There are also questions about the vetting process before Miss McCammond receives the job.

The row has caused enormous embarrassment for Condé Nast and Dame Anna, who are still reeling from claims by its own staff that Vogue has discriminated against minority groups on its pages and in the office.

And last week, Vogue US made an extraordinary statement that the Daily Mail was racist after a headline regarding Prince Harry’s engagement and Meghan spoke of “insignificant” concerns.

Despite a complaint from this newspaper about the “extremely serious and unfounded allegation”, Dame Anna’s team refused to correct it.

Prior to leaving, Miss McCammond had had individual access to staff members and said in a note to colleagues at Teen Vogue that the tweets were “offensive and silly.”

The old tweets resurfaced after Miss McCammond was named the new Teen Vogue editor on March 5.  In a 2011 tweet, when she was 17, she wrote about how she struggled not to wake up with swollen Asian eyes.

The old tweets resurfaced after Miss McCammond was named the new editor-in-chief of Teen Vogue on March 5. In a 2011 tweet, when she was 17, she wrote about how she Google searched for how not to wake up with puffy Asian eyes.

She had previously issued a public apology in 2019 and was believed to have learned from her mistakes, Condé Nast director of human resources Stan Duncan said in a note to staff.

The Daily Beast reported that the reaction from the staff at Teen Vogue was “mixed” and that some thought Miss McCammond was remorseful, while others did not think she should get the job.

Staff were instructed to keep reviews ‘in the family’, arranging any plans to speak through the company’s communications department. In addition to posting the controversial photo, The National Pulse wrote: “This is what the left calls ‘cultural appropriation’ and it frequently tries to ‘nullify’ people for ‘crime’.

“The National Pulse’s haters override the cultivation and constant churning out of ‘gotcha’ stories involving people’s lives. But we like to emphasize the hypocrisy of the left more. Hence this article.

Conde Nast declined to comment on the new allegations last night.

But a Vogue insider said, “We were hoping it would work and that’s why we’ve had so many meetings over the past two weeks to chat internally. “

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