Career coaches share advice on a post-COVID-19 world

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Career coaches share advice on a post-COVID-19 world


It has now been more than 12 long months since the coronavirus pandemic has turned our daily lives upside down. For career counselors who dedicate their 9 to 5 to helping people grow professionally, this chapter has certainly challenged their standard MO.
From advising clients on how to be successful in a job interview with Zoom or using downtime for career advancement, their sessions have been more than ‘let’s improve your CV’. .

Here, these work gurus reflect on the best lessons they’ve learned over the past year and how you can move forward in the next one.

Grieve and go ahead

For some, that may mean dealing with the loss of a job or being abruptly fired at the start of the pandemic. For others, it might mean goodbye to college or graduate school and facing uncertainty.

By witnessing this unfolding, Elena Mosaner gleaned one of her greatest ideas as a coach specializing in career development and high performance.
“Those who were able to come to terms with the loss of their old life, including the loss of jobs and what it would offer, could reinvent themselves faster. “

By witnessing this unfolding, Elena Mosaner gleaned one of her greatest ideas as a coach specializing in career development and high performance.

“It is essential to move past stages of grief, such as denial, anger, negotiation, depression, and arrive at a final stage of acceptance,” Mosaner said. “Those who were able to accept the loss of their old life, including the loss of jobs and what it would offer [travel, perks, social aspects of work] could reinvent themselves more quickly.

Take one of Mosaner’s clients, who lost his office job. She accepted the unexpected job loss, using it as fuel to chart a new course. “She decided to become a police officer. She found the courage to let go of the job that she said would bring in a lot of money and turn to what she previously believed. [she couldn’t achieve]”Mosaner said.

Find an impartial advisor

Debra Wheatman has learned that people need someone to talk to.
Debra Wheatman has learned that people need someone they can talk to honestly.

As a career coach working with unemployed clients, Debra Wheatman, President and Founder of Careers Done Write, has learned that people need someone to talk to. “They need a non-judgmental resource – someone who will offer them simple advice and guidance on how to productively seek work,” she said.

It may be beneficial to find a confidant in someone outside of your field to offer a different perspective, as they are likely to be less of a preacher, not having had first-hand experience in your career niche. Say, a varsity athletic trainer for a recent college graduate or a software engineering friend if you work in advertising.

Be more patient after an interview

“Hurry and wait,” as my father always says, has now tripled as a result of bureaucratic delays in which many companies are currently involved.

“Candidates have not taken into account the increased length of a hiring decision due to the pandemic,” said Damian Birkel, founder and executive director of the Professionals in Transition support group. “With many people working from home, trying to bring people together to make a hiring decision is like raising cats.”

On the plus side, due to these longer lead times, you may end up with a job offer in hand when an offer for another potential gig comes up. By using the leverage of two offers, you may be able to negotiate a higher salary, more free time, flexible hours, or other perks.

"Candidates did not take into account the increase in the length of a hiring decision due to the pandemic," this Damian Birkel.
“Candidates did not take into account the increased length of a hiring decision due to the pandemic,” Damian Birkel said.
Dennis Kale

Take care of your mental health …

The dramatic changes in our day-to-day lives following the pandemic have shown “perfectly” for Joshua Crawford, career coach for Proprius, that it is essential to prioritize mental and emotional health, especially when looking for a job or a new career. That’s why Crawford recommends keeping a schedule close to standard working hours. Forget the nap until noon.

“Get up early, get moving and stay optimistic,” he said. “This will translate to your job search.

Carolyn Kleiman, career coach at ResumeBuilder.com, added that job seekers should spend an hour each day reading news in their respective fields.
Carolyn Kleiman, career coach at ResumeBuilder.com, added that job seekers should spend an hour each day reading news in their respective fields.
LinkedIn

Carolyn Kleiman, career coach at ResumeBuilder.com, added that job seekers should spend an hour every day reading news in their respective fields and an hour spent reaching people and setting up meetings.

“Going through the same large job board day after day is probably not going to give the desired result. It’s a false sense to move forward, ”Kleiman said. “People often think, ‘I sent 50 resumes last week, now I’m going to sit down and wait for the call.’ It is rarely an effective method. ”

… And physical health too

“Building better habits has become one of the key parts of personal growth in limbo and trying to figure out the sequel,” Mosaner said, recalling counseling a college football coach from Coney Island who found himself unemployed last year.

“The man had just lost his job, was on unemployment benefits and was very anxious about his future. Take care of your health [by] improving her eating habits, cutting sugar from her diet and quitting smoking became the key to her transition to a new life, ”she said, adding that they did an entire session on building better habits. .

As a result, Mosaner stresses the importance of taking the time to take care of yourself, exercise daily, improve posture, and start a new lifestyle (if necessary) when looking for a new job. or plan your next move.

“Become an even better version of yourself. Don’t let COVID-19 be the reason for poor health and overweight. Do the opposite. Beat it. ”

Record wins

Okay, so you meditate, put the pedal on the metal of your stationary bike and follow the directions. Here’s another essential habit you can add to your job search routine.

“Keep track of what you are doing [for your job search] and victories. It lets you see the positive things, ”Wheatman said. “Keep an open mind for the future. Things are constantly evolving and changing. The future brings new and exciting challenges to be discovered. ”

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