The race to replace Bill de Blasio: who will be the next mayor of New York? | New York

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On #New #Year’s #Day 2014, #New #York #Mayor #Bill de #Blasio took office promising to end the “two-city story” with a progressive agenda he said would tackle inequality economic and social that “threaten to unravel the city we love”.

#But seven years and a global pandemic later, the campaign to decide on the #Democrat’s successor is heating up, and the next mayor appears poised to inherit a city where experts say those disparities are not only growing, but in a state of repair. crisis.

#In the wake of the coronavirus, which to date has killed more than 25,000 people in the city, #New #York faces an unemployment rate of 12.1% – almost double that of the entire #United #States – the threat of mass evictions, an upsurge in gun violence and burglaries, a multi-billion dollar funding gap and an exodus of more than 300,000 people.

“This is without a doubt the most difficult situation a mayor has faced,” said #Kathryn #Wylde, president and CEO of the #Partnership for #New #York group of companies. “##September 11 was difficult, but it was confined to a geographic area of ​​the city.”

#People wait in line at the #St #Clements #Food #Pantry for food in #New #York #City on #December 11. #Photograph: #Carlo #Allegri / #Reuters

#While she said the health implications of #Covid-19 are increasingly understood, the economic impact is only showing. “##Nobody really knows the consequences there, it’s still a moving target and a growing number.”

#And yet, despite the unprecedented challenges, there is no shortage of people vying to become the next mayor. #So far, 32 candidates have filed papers to participate in the 2021 race, according to the city’s #Campaign #Finance #Board (CFB).

#It’s a diverse field that includes several former members of the #De #Blasio administration, a member of #Barack #Obama’s #White #House cabinet, and a former #New #York police officer. #Former #Democratic presidential candidate #Andrew #Yang has filed papers and is reportedly preparing to start a race in early or mid-January.

#De #Blasio’s term does not officially end until #December 31, 2021. #But less than six months away from the #Democratic primaries of #June 22 – which, due to the city’s left-wing politics, will likely decide the winner of the #November elections – the candidates will not have long to present their arguments.

#With industries such as retail, tourism, foodservice, culture and entertainment suffering, and a third of the city’s 240,000 small businesses set to fail to reopen, the city’s economic recovery is set to take its place. central.

#Jonathan #Bowles, executive director of the #Center for an #Urban #Future, said the city was on the verge of a “potential tax catastrophe” if it did not get the help it needs from the federal government, which could lead to financial hardship. major cuts in subways, sanitation and parks.

#Although the $ 900 billion stimulus bill passed by #Congress in #December included some funding for public transportation, it did not include aid to states and local governments, and the #Metropolitan #Transportation #Authority of #New #York still faces an $ 8 billion deficit.

“Even as the city loses all kinds of income, tax revenue, the need for a safety net increases. #People are hungry, they are lining up for soup kitchens, more people are becoming homeless, so these are huge issues the city is facing, ”#Bowles said.

“#At the same time, the way the pandemic has changed the economy, with people working from home, creates all kinds of risk that some people will leave #New #York or that people who have moved temporarily will not return.

The next mayor must prioritize reconstruction in a more inclusive way, he said, because “too few #New #Yorkers got ahead during boom times of the past decade and a lot of these disparities , these racial and ethnic disparities, have accelerated in this pandemic. ”

#Other issues likely to be among the new mayor’s immediate priorities are education, social and racial justice and crime.

Mayoral candidate Eric Adams served as an officer in the New York City Police Department (NYPD) for 22 years.
#Mayoral candidate #Eric #Adams served as an officer in the #New #York #City #Police #Department (NYPD) for 22 years. #Photographie: #Lev #Radin / #Pacific #Press / #Rex / #Shutterstock

“The first thing is jobs, schools, crime. #That’s it. #You get any of those that work, you’ll be better than the current mayor, ”said #Mitchell #Moss, professor of politics and planning at NYU. #De #Blasio, he said, had “clearly checked” and lost the trust of teachers, police, parents and his own staff.

#Although his successes include implementing free pre-kindergarten for all, the mayor has been criticized for his leadership – including his handling of the pandemic and the #Black #Lives #Matter protests following the police murder of #George. #Floyd – and his failed 2020 presidential election. #He’s also known to bicker publicly with #New #York #Gov. #Andrew #Cuomo.

#Bill #Neidhardt, a spokesperson for the mayor, said: “#Mayor de #Blasio just made the biggest move in decades to integrate public schools on the same day he embarked on more than 20 new government reforms. NYPD… #If someone doesn’t believe the work is important or urgent, then I don’t know what to tell them.

#Right now, #Moss said, it’s a “wide open race”. #In addition to campaigning during a pandemic, candidates will also need to educate voters on a new priority voting system, which critics say has not been adequately explained to voters.

They will also have to convince #New #Yorkers to come vote. #In 2013, #De #Blasio won the #Democratic mayor’s primary – in which only registered #Democrats can vote – with the votes of about 3% of all #New #Yorkers.

#Among the pioneers to date are #City #Comptroller #Scott #Stringer; #Brooklyn #Borough #President #Eric #Adams; lawyer and civil rights activist #Maya #Wiley; #Obama’s #Housing #Secretary and #Budget #Director #Shaun #Donovan; former sanitation commissioner #Kathryn #Garcia; former nonprofit executive #Dianne #Morales and former #Citigroup #Vice #President #Ray #McGuire, who kicked off his campaign with a video narrated by #Spike #Lee.

#Adams, 60, was an officer in the #New #York #City #Police #Department (NYPD) for 22 years and, in 2013, was elected the first president of the #Brooklyn #Black #Quarter. #He decided to join the NYPD after being beaten up by police at the age of 15 because he wanted to change it from within.

“#I know #New #York, I have had hard times, I have overcome them and now we need a mayor who can overcome and help people overcome the difficult times they face,” he said. he declares.

#He does not believe in “cutting funding” from the police, but says police spending could be improved to “go from reactionary to crime and become proactive.”

New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer.
#New #York #City #Comptroller #Scott #Stringer. #Photographie: #Europa #Newswire / #Rex / #Shutterstock

#He wants to improve relations between #New #Yorkers and his police force by hiring more city officers and also reportedly has a “zero tolerance” approach to abusive police officers.

#He called for the postponement of the priority choice vote because he said the city had failed to educate voters on the new system which, in effect, “will deprive voters of their rights.”

#Stringer, 60, who has been a city comptroller since 2013, said if he became mayor he would “turn the page on the last eight years.”

#His first order of business, he said, would be to “close our budget deficit and get to work to get the economy going in a fair and equitable way.”

#Donovan, 54, said his experience with crises, budget management and dealing with the #Biden administration since his time in the #White #House would serve him well as mayor. #He added: “##Reconstruct must start with repairing our civic fabric and repairing our quality of life.”

#He plans to focus on fairness and appoint the city’s first equity director and make #New #York “the world’s first equity city.”

Mayoral candidate Maya Wiley said Covid-19 caused a `` historic humanitarian crisis '' in the city.
#Mayoral candidate #Maya #Wiley said #Covid-19 caused a “historic humanitarian crisis” in the city. #Photographie: #MediaPunch / REX / #Shutterstock

#If #Wiley, 55, who was one of #De #Blasio’s primary legal advisers and worked as a legal analyst for NBC #News and MSNBC, became mayor, she would be the first woman and only the second black person in the role. .

#She said #New #York needs to learn from the city’s previous crises where the city has recovered but has not addressed its underlying issues.

“##For every time we’ve had seizures in this city, we’ve recovered – we just haven’t recovered everyone.”

#Instead, she said, the city should invest its budget “in a fair and equitable way” and in a way that preserves its diversity.

#She said the coronavirus created a “historic humanitarian crisis” in the city and the resulting loss of life caused “indescribable” trauma.

“#We are traumatized as a city, we are afraid, we have lost. #And that’s why we need leadership that really brings us together to build on our strengths, to bring us together.

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