Massachusetts Launches Interactive COVID Dashboard, Confirms 375,000 Cases – NBC Boston

0
42


Massachusetts unveiled its long-awaited interactive, searchable coronavirus dashboard on Monday, making some of the state’s detailed data on the pandemic more accessible to the public.

See the dashboard here.

Data on Monday showed the state had confirmed more than 375,000 cases of COVID-19 during the pandemic. The Massachusetts Department of Public Health confirmed 4,358 new cases of the virus, bringing the total to 375,455, and 60 more deaths brought the death toll to 12,401.

A more likely death has also been reported, which means 270 deaths are now considered likely related to COVID-19 in the state.

The percentage of coronavirus tests coming back positive, on average, has increased to 8.5%, the department said.

The number of patients hospitalized for COVID-19 increased again to 2,339. Of those hospitalized, 423 have been listed as being in intensive care unit and 258 are intubated, according to the DPH.

Governor Charlie Baker details the distribution of vaccines for mass first responders.

The state is now in the midst of a post-holiday surge in coronavirus cases, which is not necessarily fully reflected in the data, Baker said on Monday.

“Obviously due to the holidays there are some delays in reporting and fewer people are getting tested. We expect this to catch up fairly quickly and give us a better picture of where our trends are now in the coming days, ”he said. .

The new dashboard was loading when it debuted just before 5 p.m., but it appeared to be having issues with its server shortly thereafter. A note added to the page later read: “Due to the high volumes of web traffic, some users had difficulty accessing today’s COVID-19 dashboard. We are working quickly to resolve this issue and plan to re-release the dashboard soon. ”

The dashboard includes both textual and graphical overviews of various measures of the coronavirus, including cases, deaths, tests and hospitalizations, as well as several breakouts that offer more details on the measures.

Massachusetts Department of Health

The Trends tab of the Massachusetts coronavirus dashboard as it appeared when it debuted on Monday, January 4, 2020.

The Department of Public Health is taking its “data to a new level by building an interactive, more user-friendly dashboard to review it,” Governor Charlie Baker said earlier Monday at a press briefing.

The dashboard will be developed further in the future, Baker added.

State coronavirus data has so far been available in a long .pdf document made available for download around 5 p.m. daily. More data, such as city-by-city risk of coronavirus transmission and the number of vaccines administered in the state, is available in reports released weekly.

Other states have had digital dashboards for months, and the Massachusetts version has also been in the works for weeks.

Doctors fear that the increase in volume they are already seeing will only get worse when the post-Christmas peak begins to strike.

This fall, several public health experts told NBC10 Boston that the state’s coronavirus data has been presented in particularly depth. Dr Thomas Tsai, a professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, who studies public health, policy and data science, said it was more important than presenting data from accessible and interactive way.

He noted that the state of Georgia had contracted out its dashboard, which looked good but had questionable data – Atlanta Magazine called it a disaster that damaged the reputation of the Department of Public Health’s Georgia – and was a much worse alternative to what Massachusetts provided.

“I actually think the Massachusetts scorecard actually has a really great wealth of data that a lot of other states don’t have,” he said, calling the previous state scorecard l ‘equivalent of a Powerpoint presentation that is “very useful for public health researchers and for public health response.” “



LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here