Latest Brexit: Trade Deal Failure Emerges – France Insists UK ‘Must Follow EU Rules’ | Politics | New

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Speaking to Bloomberg, the French politician argued that the UK had agreed to give up some of its sovereign ability to decide EU rules in exchange for block market access. Mr Beaune said Brussels would continue to insist and demonstrate that staying in the ‘club’ will always be the best option, with the aim of minimizing Brexit. He said: “We want to insist that the UK got the EU market access that we were prepared to provide.

“But the respect for our rules and our standards which limits their ability to be fully sovereign.
“But that’s the balance they chose. And I think in a way that’s not the best situation.

“They will have access to the market but they will not decide the rules of this large European market.

“I think it’s a lot better, and we should demonstrate it and insist on it, be with the club and be able to decide the rules. ”

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It comes as French fishmongers and seafood factories suspend orders from Britain and fight to save supply chains just in time after being disrupted by post-Brexit red tape that prevents delivery the next day salmon and lobster from Britain to Europe.

Importers in Boulogne-sur-Mer told Reuters that deliveries were sometimes delayed because the Latin names of fish species were incorrectly entered on the papers.

Other reasons for the delays include health certificates missing the required buffers and French agents taking a zero-tolerance approach to errors in the tedious process.

The result is a chaotic breakdown in supply chains from the far reaches of the British Isles to the port of Boulogne in northern France, which used to see scampi and Scottish scallops in French shops a bit more than a day after harvest.

Mille said he sent a text message to French customs officials asking them to take some peace of mind while the industry learned to navigate the new bureaucracy, but had yet to receive a response.

The delays mean that seafood is not always as fresh as it used to be in European markets. In a shipment of crab caught in England that arrived at Mille’s warehouse a day late on Saturday, 20% of the crustaceans had perished.

Brexit set aside decades of cooperation to refine the supply chain, said some importers from Boulogne, Europe’s largest fish processing center.

“We’ve lost 30 years,” Mille said.

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