Jordan North of I’m A Celeb narrowly avoided death in terrorist attack killing 29 people

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Jordan North, I’m A Celebrity finalist, could have been killed in Northern Ireland’s worst terrorist atrocity.

The Radio One DJ – whose father was stationed in Omagh in the 1990s – was supposed to visit the town the day she was hit by a devastating bomb that killed 29 people, including a woman pregnant with twins.

Speaking of the Real IRA explosion on August 15, 1998, when he was eight years old, Jordan said, “My father was in the military for 24 years. In 1997 his battalion, the Queen’s Lancashire Regiment, was posted to Omagh, so we moved there.

“In August 1998, when the Omagh bomb hit, we were there at the time and we had to go into town that day, to Omagh.

Jordan North of I’m A Celeb narrowly avoided death in terrorist attack killing 29 people
(Image: ITV / REX / Shutterstock)

“But I’m one of four boys and my mom said we all play. It was in the middle of summer vacation and it was hot. It wasn’t raining for once. But my mom said, “I’m not going to town with all of this. They make my face in it, so we decided to go for a walk.

“We were in Gortin Glen when the bomb went off. We heard it from there. It was a horrible time. Dad threw us all into the car because he knew we had to go back to camp.

“I remember I was only eight years old and it was one of the first times I felt really sad.”

The Radio One DJ – whose father was stationed in Omagh in the 1990s – was supposed to visit the town the day he was hit by a devastating bomb that killed 29 people, including a woman pregnant with twins.
(Image: ITV / REX / Shutterstock)

Jordan revealed his pain at the bombshell on a BBC Radio Ulster show called Lockdown Lowdown that aired earlier this year before entering the I’m A Celebrity Castle.

The DJ was a guest on the Radio Ulster show when his Belfast-born friend and Radio One colleague Mairead discovered his close ties to Northern Ireland.

Jordan, whose quick wit helped convince viewers of I’m A Celeb, told presenters his best friends at college were from Northern Ireland and he got along so well with them because that he appreciated their humor.

Jordan revealed his pain at the bombshell on BBC Radio Ulster show called Lockdown Lowdown
(Image: BBC)

He added that the North Irish accent was his favorite.

“I love the people of Northern Ireland,” he said.

“I think they have a really good sense of humor, that self-deprecating sense of humor that I love, and how they’re not afraid to separate from each other.

“I think it stems from the history of Northern Ireland, like ‘we had a hard time and we are laughing’ like you don’t laugh you’ll cry, a little bit. ”

Jordan also said he hoped to travel to Northern Ireland again as he would like to spend a night in Belfast.
(Image: Instagram)

He told a story he was told about his father and uncle, who was also a soldier, arresting a man on mistaken identity, and how he turned out to be the former Catchphrase host Roy Walker.

Jordan also said he was hoping to visit Northern Ireland again as he would love to spend an evening in Belfast and a trip to Giant’s Causeway. He also said he would love to see Omagh again and that he thinks he will still remember his way around town.

He said: “A great love for the people of Northern Ireland. I think you are awesome and this is a beautiful part of the world.

“I always say it’s also the most suitable accent. I had the same conversation with my roommates recently.

“They said the Geordie accent was the best, or Essex or Scottish accent, but I was like, ‘No, that’s Northern Ireland for me.’

Tonight Jordan takes on Giovanna Fletcher and Vernon Kay in the finale of I’m A Celebrity. He entered as a relatively unknown DJ but will walk away with millions of fans and the prospect of landing other TV appearances and a host of promotional opportunities that will make him rich.

Humble Jordan had no intention of spending much when he left the show – saying upon entering camp that part of his appearance fee would be spent on buying a new kitchen for his mother.

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