Stratford-upon-Avon: Why are WE paying the price at level three?

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Hever, Kent, was at level one before the country was locked up. But despite fewer than three cases last week, he will reappear at level three. Duncan Leslie, managing director of Hever Castle (above), the childhood home of Anne Boleyn, said the decision was particularly “irritating” when infection rates are higher in neighboring villages in Surrey and of Sussex, which are on level two.

Hever, Kent, was at level one before the country was locked up. But despite fewer than three cases last week, he will reappear at level three.

Laura Palmer, of the Hever Residents’ Association, said the decision was a blow to a village so small it does not have shops or sidewalks where residents could catch the virus from each other.

Duncan Leslie, managing director of Hever Castle, the childhood home of Anne Boleyn, said the decision was particularly “irritating” when infection rates are higher in neighboring villages of Surrey and Sussex, which are found on level two.

Mr Leslie, 51, has warned that the castle, pictured – a huge tourist attraction that employs many villagers – will make a seven-figure loss this year.

Meanwhile, King Henry VIII pub owner David Brant said: “All you can do is make it level one or two and then when it’s level three it’s horrible because that you foresee the best case. “

Mr. Brant, 40, added that his newspaper was “jam-packed” with Christmas bookings that will now have to be canceled.

Residents of Great Torrington (above) who have faithfully complied with two national lockdowns find themselves stranded at level two.  This means that friends cannot meet indoors and pubs must remain closed unless they are serving meals.

Residents of Great Torrington (above) who have faithfully complied with two national lockdowns find themselves stranded at level two. This means that friends cannot meet indoors and pubs must remain closed unless they are serving meals.

Tarka the city of the dead otter in the water

Great Torrington isn’t just the setting for the children’s classic Tarka the Otter. The market town of North Devon has also been hailed as the healthiest place in Britain.

A study last year praised its low pollution levels and good access to NHS services. Of course, a lot has changed since then, but Great Torrington, pictured, remains in relatively good health.

For most of this year, there have been fewer than three cases of the coronavirus each week. That number rose to six in the second week of November, then fell to five by the third week, for a rate of just 83 infections per 100,000 people.

Despite these encouraging figures, residents who have faithfully complied with two national lockdowns find themselves stranded at level two. This means that friends cannot meet inside and pubs must remain closed unless they are serving meals.

Waitress Keeley Allin feared for her job at the Market Cafe. “We will not be allowed to serve mixed households indoors. Much of our business is built on that. We will be open next week, but we really have no idea how many clients we will have. The 24-year-old – who also happens to be the town’s mayor – has warned that pubs will suffer the most. “Some will remain closed and you wonder if they will ever reopen… it’s very sad. “

Brian and Vicky Conrad, who started their own guitar store three months ago, fear the Tier Two status may deter customers from heading downtown.

“During all this time, we haven’t won anything,” Mr. Conrad said. “The big online retailers have picked it up and I’m afraid this latest blow will destroy us.

Mr Conrad, 51, decided to try selling guitars after the pandemic abruptly ended his career as an IT consultant in March. “We got a reasonable subsidy from the government,” he said. “It got us through what should have been our best trading period. But we are now suffering the fallout because the government did not respond properly in the first place.

Ms Conrad, 49, said: “It’s so sad. We felt that we had done everything right and that we were trying to find a new way to make a living. Now we are dead in the water.

The market town of Bourne lived under relative freedom from Level 1 restrictions before the second lockdown

The market town of Bourne lived under relative freedom from Level 1 restrictions before the second lockdown

Bourne absurdity

The market town of Bourne lived under relative freedom from Level 1 restrictions before the second lockdown.

And its population of around 14,000 saw just 21 new cases of the coronavirus last week.

But Lincolnshire business owners and city councilors have been horrified by the news that they will be upgrading to level three next month.

The area, pictured above, is known for its natural springs and agriculture. It faces the same measures as the rest of the county which has a high number of cases in the north.

However, the people of Bourne stress that they are only a few miles from Peterborough, which has a higher number of infections per 100,000 people, but will be at level two when the country escapes lockdown.

Councilor Brenda Johnson said, “Bourne is going to suffer, it’s absolutely crazy. “

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