Electric bike prices will be cut by up to a third in the cycling revolution

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The cost of e-bikes should be reduced to allow commuters to get to work sweat-free.

Ministers plan to step up the use of e-bikes with a taxpayer-funded program targeting “people who need to wear work clothes without sweating.”

Transport Minister Chris Heaton-Harris has suggested the grants will be unveiled next spring.

Electric bikes are equipped with an electric motor to increase your own pedal power, allowing you to cover long distances with less effort than a conventional bicycle

Transport Minister Chris Heaton-Harris suggested the grants would be unveiled next spring

Transport Minister Chris Heaton-Harris suggested the grants would be unveiled next spring

Sales of e-bikes and e-scooters have more than tripled since last year, with commuters avoiding public transport amid the coronavirus pandemic.

According to the Times, the electric bike financing program would be similar to the subsidies available for plug-in vehicles, which offer up to 35% off the cost of purchase.

Ministers hope the program will help those who are less fit or older, who might be discouraged by regular bikes, get back in the saddle.

They could receive up to a third of the £ 600-3,000 cost of a new machine to get them to exercise more or leave the car at home.

It comes after Boris Johnson unveiled plans for a third electric bike, NHS bikes and a free service as part of a £ 2bn anti-obesity campaign in July.

Speaking at the time, the Prime Minister said drivers need to understand that they will ‘share the roads’ as measures costing £ 2bn are taken to promote cycling and walking.

Mr Heaton-Harris said the government “is developing a national support program to boost the adoption of e-bikes to levels seen in many other countries.”

An electric bike is a regular bike with gears and breaks, and the addition of a battery powered motor.

Electric bikes can be recharged from the mains using a conventional three-prong plug.  Charging takes a few hours, depending on the size of the battery

Electric bikes can be recharged from the mains using a conventional three-prong plug. Charging takes a few hours, depending on the size of the battery

Sales of electric bikes and electric scooters have more than tripled since last year, with commuters avoiding public transport for fear of catching coronavirus

Sales of e-bikes and electric scooters have more than tripled since last year, with commuters avoiding public transport for fear of catching coronavirus

What are the different types of electric bikes?

Just like mechanical models, there are different types of electric bikes depending on your specific needs. These are:

Classic: The most popular type of electric bicycle for everyday use. Ideal for surfaces like tarmac and smooth bridal aisles.

Hybrid: These are very versatile and can be used on uneven and rough terrain as well as regular roads.

Mountain: Electric mountain bikes have thicker tires and front and rear suspension, allowing you to get through the roughest terrain.

Pliant: These can be easily folded up for storage and travel and are perfect for busy commuters, camping vacations, and people with limited space at home.

As you pedal, the motor kicks in to inject additional power up to a top speed of 15 mph – the legal limit. Faster than that and you’ll have to go on your own.

Electric bikes have a display panel on the handlebars that the rider can use to control the motor.

If English motorists switched from cars to e-bikes for every trip where possible, the amount of CO2 emissions from cars could be reduced by 50%, according to a study by the University of Leeds.

This equates to around 30 million tonnes per year.

Electric bikes can be recharged from the mains using a conventional three-prong plug.

Charging takes a few hours, depending on the size of the battery.

In the UK, e-bikes can be ridden by anyone aged 14 and over and they do not require a license.

You do not have to pay road tax and insurance is not compulsory.

According to marketing analyst Mintel, around 100,000 e-bikes were sold in the UK in 2019, up from 73,000 in 2018, an increase of over 40% year-over-year.

In February 2020, 17% of cyclists intended to buy an e-bike in the next 12 months, up from 14% in January 2019.

A Mintel study after Britain was blocked in April suggested that 14% of cyclists intended to buy an e-bike in the next 12 months, up from 11% in 2017.

Overall, 45% of current cyclists say they would be interested in trying an electric bike, while 32% of “potential cyclists” are also interested in trying one.

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