Coronavirus France: a dance teacher protests against the locking of a supermarket

0
65


A ballet teacher filmed herself dancing in the aisle of a French supermarket to denounce the government’s “absurd” approach to lockdown.

Amandine Aguilar, from Sausset-les-Pins, in southwestern France, said she recorded the daring video to challenge how the ‘absurd’ handling of the Covid-19 pandemic by the Macron administration has left the arts in pain.

Dressed in a black tutu saying “I am not essential”, she danced in the aisle of a supermarket located in Marignane.

She could be seen trying to access “non-essential” items, which were cordoned off to customers, and picking up several packages of toilet paper and pasta in a nod to some customers’ frantic stockpiling before. the first French lockdown, which began in March. 17 and lasted until May 11.

Jumping into the store in the video, Amandine later wrote on Facebook about several closures and the lack of support from the government had left her “tired” and “depressed”.

Dance teacher Amandine Aguilar, from Sausset-les-Pins, in southwest France, recorded a daring video of herself dancing in a supermarket to challenge the ‘absurd’ management of the French government restrictions of Covid-19

Amandine was filmed shopping in a black tutu as she stocked toilet paper (pictured) to call attention to the government not considering dance lessons 'essential'

Amandine was filmed shopping in a black tutu as she stocked toilet paper (pictured) to draw attention to the government not seeing dance lessons as ‘essential’

France has now entered a second lockdown on October 29, which will last until December 1.

The dance teacher took issue with schools remaining open during the lockdown, but extracurricular activities such as dancing were forced to cease, leaving her unemployed for the second time this year.

In the video, Amandine, dressed in ballerinas and a black tutu with “I am not essential” signs on the front and back, entered the store like any other shopper to the sound of a remix. of Swan Lake.

She first went to a section of “non-essential” products, which had been cordoned off by the supermarket to limit their access to customers.

Amandine could be seen trying to get her hands on the items including children’s toys and Christmas decorations.

Amandine could be seen dancing and jumping in the mall, with a sign pinned to her tutu saying `` I'm not essential ''

Amandine could be seen dancing and jumping in the mall, with a sign pinned to her tutu saying “I am not essential”

At one point, the ballerina could be seen using the rope to mimic strangulation, in a symbolic act depicting her feeling that the government is “gagging” the arts with new measures.

Continuing with her shopping, Amandine then moved on to dance the grocery and meat shelves, while the surprised shoppers watched in disbelief.

She could also be seen stocking packets of toilet paper and pasta, two of the items prized by panicked shoppers when lockdowns began to take effect across Europe in March.

Food aisle shoppers joined in Amandine's dance in the video, which was shared by the dance teacher on Facebook

Food aisle shoppers joined in Amandine’s dance in the video, which was shared by the dance teacher on Facebook

The dance teacher filmed herself trying to enter the non-essential aisle, which was cordoned off to prevent shoppers from reaching them (pictured)

The dance teacher filmed herself trying to enter the non-essential aisle, which was cordoned off to prevent shoppers from reaching them (pictured)

Much like she did with the toilet, Amandine pretended to stockpile pasta in the video, in a nod to the wholesale buying frenzy that swept the world when the first lockdowns were announced in March.

Much like she did with the toilet, Amandine pretended to stockpile pasta in the video, in a nod to the wholesale buying frenzy that swept the world when the first lockdowns were announced in March.

In a heartfelt post on Facebook, she wrote: “I’m not questioning the lockdowm, I’m just pointing out the absurdity with which it’s handled.

“Director of an art association, I suffered two administrative closures. I can’t see the end of the tunnel. I am a confined and depressed artist, ”she continued.

She also revealed that the supermarket, which she decided not to name, let her dance for 30 minutes before sending security after her.

Amandine dancing on pointe in the food aisle of the supermarket

-Passers-by watch the dance teacher as she jumps down the aisle

Surprised shoppers watched Amandine leap and spin in the supermarket’s food aisle

At the end of the video, Amandine was filmed leaving the store.  She said she had suffered two closures due to covid this year and couldn't see 'the end of the tunnel'

At the end of the video, Amandine was filmed leaving the store. She said she had suffered two closures due to covid this year and could not see ‘the end of the tunnel’

Speaking to national television France 3, she explained that her husband is a teacher, and said that it was “illogical” that many more children could go to school, while the little ones groups cannot do extracurricular activities.

What are France’s foreclosure rules

After a first lockout which lasted from March 17 to May 11, France implemented a second lockout on October 29 to stem a new wave of the coronavirus pandemic.

It should stay in place at least until December 1.

The national company has seen all non-essential businesses shut down.

Kindergartens, primary and secondary schools remained open with “reinforced health protocols”.

This has seen the return of an authorization form that the French must take with them when they go out to prove that they are allowed not to be home.

Although meetings outside her home are prohibited, visits to nursing homes are permitted under the new rules.

“Dancing and teaching children to dance is my life. Prohibiting myself from doing it takes a part of myself, ”said Amandine, who was teaching online through Facebook.

“Our profession inspires joy and makes the world happier. Isn’t it essential to bring joy to people? she asked in the same interview.

France entered its second lockout on October 29, as part of new “adapted” measures, which have seen schools remain open.

As non-essential businesses have had to close, including bars and restaurants, preschool, elementary and secondary school students have been allowed to attend classes under “enhanced health protocols.”

Universities across the country have closed, with classes resuming online for these students.

Extracurricular activities have been canceled and any meeting outside his home is prohibited, except for a visit to a retirement home to see his relatives, according to strict rules.

The new measures are expected to be implemented at least until December 1.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here