The cycle lane on Euston Road will be removed, resulting in the removal of OTHER lanes

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A cycle lane introduced as lockdowns have been eased in an attempt to reduce the number of cars in London is being removed after causing traffic chaos.

Less than six months after Transport for London announced a series of measures to reduce traffic in the capital, the Euston Road cycle lane is expected to be removed.

Changes to the streets, which saw some roads closed to traffic except for pedestrians and cyclists, caused major problems in parts of London as workers returned to offices but avoided transport in common to ensure that they were respecting social distancing measures.

But after today’s overthrow, announced by TfL commissioner Andy Byford, there are calls for other projects to be scrapped, including at Park Lane.

Tonight Transport for London has said all of its Streetspace projects are “temporary” as it expects to make changes on Euston Road in the “next few weeks”.

The large cycle lanes on Euston Road remained mostly empty, the lanes were created at the cost of space on the roadway for passing motorists.

Tony Devenish, Tory member of the London Assembly, told Mr Byford: ‘It would be really helpful, in terms of congestion, if you could remove this one. “

Pop-up cycle lanes on either side of Euston Road were opened by TfL in July, with speed limits of 20 mph for passing motorists, but three months later the London Transport Commissioner announced that ‘it would be deleted.

The tracks were due to be cut at the end of 2021 as part of the progression on HS2, but they are expected to be cut a year earlier than planned.

Transport for London told MailOnline this evening it has no plans to cut the Park Lane cycling program.

When the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, announced the new street space measures – designed to widen pedestrian and cycle lanes at the expense of pavements – his office bragged about cycling “10 times.”

Photos taken last month showed how many of London’s cycle lanes remain empty, with adjacent roads filled with motorists.

As of Monday morning, TomTom data revealed there were 527 miles of traffic jam in the capital at 9 a.m. with 1,340 total traffic jams – and congestion levels at 66%.

The ephemeral Park Lane cycle route also went relatively unused, prompting it to be closed. Traffic levels continue to rise during peak hours in London

The ephemeral Park Lane cycle route also went relatively unused, prompting it to be closed. Traffic levels continue to rise during peak hours in London

That figure was up 10 percentage points from 56% at the same point last week, and from an average of 43% compared to the same period last year.

Use of public transport during the coronavirus pandemic is well below normal levels, according to the most recent data from Transport for London.

Last Monday morning at 10 a.m., metro use fell 3% from the previous week to 732,000, or 32% of normal demand.

Meanwhile, bus usage fell 1 percent from the previous week to 964,000, or 55 percent of normal demand.

A TfL spokesperson said: “All of the Streetspace projects have been set up as temporary measures.

“We are constantly reviewing any changes to the road network to make sure they are meeting their objectives and benefiting as many people as possible.

Underground passengers board a Jubilee Line train in east London as they head to work on Monday, the number of commuters on public transport is well down from normal

Underground passengers aboard a Jubilee Line train in east London as they commute to work on Monday, the number of commuters on public transport is well down from normal

“Our Streetspace program has played an important role in the huge increases in cycling seen in London since the start of the pandemic.

“We appreciate the challenges for buses and freight on Euston Road, which our long monitoring of the area has highlighted.

“We also haven’t seen the same high increases in cycling on this stretch as in other areas.

“As a result, we are examining options to remove all or part of this temporary cycle path over the next few weeks and improve access to adjacent protected cycle paths, which will allow people to continue riding safely along this route. corridor.

“We will continue to work with the boroughs of London to ensure that our Streetspace projects support a transition to active travel.

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