NHS Covid-19 App Users Sent Incorrect Risk Level Change Alerts | World news

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Users of the NHS coronavirus app for England and Wales have reported receiving confused notifications that the level of risk in their area has changed in a way that contradicts official government guidelines.The Department of Health and Social Affairs (DHSC) said on Saturday it had identified and fixed the issue, which affected updates to the app’s postcode alert system on Friday night.

“We live in Walsall and he is classified as HIGH risk,” a user tweeted Friday.

“Why did we all get an alert saying that our risk level has changed due to ‘increased risk levels’ … but it is now MEDIUM? It’s very confusing… what is it? “

Level one – medium

  • The “rule of six” applies, which means that socializing in groups of more than six people is prohibited, whether indoors or outdoors.
  • Tradespeople can continue to go to work in a household and are not counted as part of the six person limit.
  • Businesses and venues can continue to operate, but pubs and restaurants must ensure that customers only consume food and drink when they are seated and closed between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m.
  • Takeout can continue to sell after 10 p.m. if ordered by phone or online.
  • Schools and universities remain open.
  • Places of worship remain open but people should not mix with a group of more than six people.
  • Weddings and funerals can take place with restrictions on the number of people who can attend (15 and 30 respectively).
  • Exercise classes and organized sport can continue to take place outdoors and, if the rule of six is ​​followed, indoors.

Level two – high

  • People are prohibited from socializing with anyone outside of their home or supporting the bubble in any indoor environment.
  • Trades people can continue to work in a hostel.
  • The rule of six continues to apply for socializing outdoors, such as in a garden or public space such as a park or beach.
  • Businesses and venues can continue to operate, but pubs and restaurants must ensure that customers only consume food and drink when they are seated and closed between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m.
  • Takeout can continue to sell after 10 p.m. if ordered online or over the phone.
  • Schools and universities remain open.
  • Places of worship remain open but people should not mix with a group of more than six people.
  • Weddings and funerals can take place with restrictions on the number of people who can attend (15 and 30 respectively).
  • Exercise classes and organized sport may continue to take place outdoors, but will only be allowed indoors if it is possible for people to avoid mingling with those they do not live with. (or with whom they don’t share a support bubble), or for the sport of young people or people with disabilities.
  • Travel is permitted to open facilities, for work, or to access education, but people are advised to reduce the number of trips where possible.

Level three – very high

  • People are prohibited from socializing with people with whom they do not live or with whom they have not formed a supportive bubble, in an indoor setting, private garden or in most outdoor reception areas and paid events.
  • Trades people can continue to work in a hostel.
  • The rule of six continues to apply to outdoor public spaces, such as parks, beaches, public gardens or sports venues.
  • Pubs and bars are only allowed to remain open to function as restaurants, in which case alcohol may only be served as part of a large meal.
  • Schools and universities remain open.
  • Places of worship remain open but domestic mixing is not allowed.
  • Weddings and funerals can take place with restrictions on the number of people present (15 and 30 respectively) but wedding receptions are not permitted.
  • The rules for exercise classes and organized sport are the same as in level 2. They can continue to take place outdoors but will only be allowed indoors if it is possible for people of avoid mingling with people they do not live with (or sharing bubble support with), or for youth or disability sport. However, in Merseyside, Gyms were ordered to close when they entered level 3.
  • Travel outside of a very high alert area or entering a very high alert area should be avoided, except for things such as work, education or personal services. youth, to meet family responsibilities or if you are traveling as part of a longer trip.
  • Residents of a level 3 area should avoid staying overnight in another part of the UK, while people living in a level 1 or 2 area should avoid staying overnight in a level d area. very high alert.

Photograph: Peter Byrne / PA

Another user, who lives in Wakefield, complained about being informed by the app on their iPhone that their area is listed as medium risk, but that they are considered high risk by the app on their Android device. On Saturday, the iPhone had corrected itself, he confirmed.

Meanwhile, users in London said the alert on their app still has not changed from medium to high in accordance with Level 2 lockdown restrictions that went into effect at midnight on Friday.

Ian Grundy, who lives in the London Borough of Hillingdon, said his app indicated his area was at both high and medium risk.

In response to a wave of complaints on Twitter, the official app account highlighted a “frequently asked questions” page on the NHS website. The FAQ page explains that postcode districts do not correspond exactly to local authorities, and therefore multiple alert levels may apply to a particular postcode district.

Application NHS COVID-19
(@ NHSCOVID19app)

Since this morning, # NHSCOVID19app users who live in a postcode neighborhood where the local COVID alert level has been changed to reflect the latest government guidelines, you will receive an alert during the day to notify you of the change.

➡️ https://t.co/rzgGGmuV13

October 17, 2020

On Saturday, he said users living in postcode neighborhoods where the alert level was changed to reflect the latest government guidelines would receive an alert during the day to notify them of the change.

Previously, the app had three alert levels: low, medium, and high. These have now been updated to match the Medium, High, and Super High levels of the three-level locking system introduced this week.


Jeremy Place, an information security specialist, told Sky News that as many as 4 million people could have received incorrect updates by what he described as “a big finger error.”

This likely happened when a blank file was accidentally sent to phones instead of an alert level update, he said. Any phone receiving the empty file would revert to the old system, triggering a message saying “the level of risk in your area has changed”.

A DHSC spokesperson said, “We are aware of an issue that has impacted ZIP code alert updates for some app users tonight.

“This issue was identified and resolved within an hour, and users’ phones will automatically update to display the correct local alert level for their region, along with new instructions. “



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