Jodie Whittaker discovers things she doesn’t like about her ancestors in Who Do You Think You Are?

0
86


Jodie Whittaker revealed some of the things she discovered about her ancestors in Who Do You Think You Are? went against everything [she] Believe in ‘.

The actress, 38, grew up in a Yorkshire mining village and finds out on the show that her great-grandfather was a strikebreaker in the 1920s.

Speaking to Radio Times, she said: “As I understand it, it’s their look and they work during the strike… It’s not an ideal piece of your family history. They were basically scabs.

Family: Jodie Whittaker, 38, revealed some of the things she discovered about her ancestors in Who Do You Think You Are? went against everything [she] Believe in ‘

“Living here in the 80s, the idea that you are working through a strike seems to go against everything you were raised to believe. “

Jodie talks about her ancestors who worked during the strike to her mother Yvonne in the program who says she “never stood up for them”.

The Doctor Who star discovers that his great-grandfather Edwin started working in the mines when he was only eight years old, but in 20 years he was indeed running a mine with his sons.

During the National Coal Strike of 1921 and the General Strike of 1926, when most of the miners were on strike, Edwin maintained his mine and amassed a small fortune, a hugely divisive action in part of the country where mining was important.

Story: The actress grew up in a Yorkshire mining village and finds out on the show that her great-grandfather was a strikebreaker in the 1920s (pictured in 2019)

Story: The actress grew up in a Yorkshire mining village and finds out on the show that her great-grandfather was a strikebreaker in the 1920s (pictured in 2019)

While fortunes had dwindled by the time of Jodie’s generation, she stressed that money does not equate to a happy childhood.

She said, “Look at me now! They’re sliding doors, aren’t they? [Money] does not equate to a happy childhood. My great-great-grandfather went from worker to gentleman, but it’s not like I came from the aristocracy. Class meant something back then.

Jodie also explores the family side of her father Adrian, particularly her mother Greta Verdun and her half-brother Walter who legend has been killed in action in 1916, which the actress learns is not true. .

Jodie said: “So we are following my grandmother Greta, who is my father’s mother, and she is the youngest of nine children and is named after her older brother.

She said: “As I understand it, it's their look and they work during the strike… It's not an ideal part of your family history.  They were basically scabs (pictured from 2019)

She said: “As I understand it, it’s their look and they work during the strike… It’s not an ideal part of your family history. They were basically scabs (pictured from 2019)

“His middle name is sort of his name, and to find out who he was and what a journey he’s been on – and to be so close in history to mine. I mean, literally my dad’s uncle, and we had no idea what trip he took and what obstacles he was facing.

“The real, literal battles he was in. That side was an emotional roller coaster because it was so close. It wasn’t like four generations ago, he was my father’s uncle, and now, because I’m 38, he’s like a young boy to me.

“He was a young boy, with so much life and I think those WWI stories were all historical stories to me, or movies, but nothing that was within my own family history. “

Asked what she took away from filming the show, Jodie said, “It made me feel that history can be your present, as long as you keep it present and when you pass those stories on, you keep them. people alive.

Show: Jodie talks about her ancestors who worked during the strike to her mother Yvonne in the show who says she 'never stood up for them' (pictured from January 2020)

Show: Jodie talks about her ancestors who worked during the strike to her mother Yvonne in the show who says she ‘never stood up for them’ (pictured from January 2020)

‘I now know about Walter [Grandma Greta’s brother] so he can’t die anymore, that can’t happen. I guess it’s just a matter of making sure I remember it correctly, not making my version of it and tweaking it again.

She added: “I was more nervous than [my family history] would be, and it’s so narcissistic, but I was nervous that it was properly beige.

“I thought, there must be some drama somewhere! I was really nervous that it sounded like, “Well, that’s boring, isn’t it?” That was what worried me the most, but it was the opposite.

Who do you think you are? Series 17 airs at 9 p.m. on Monday, October 12 on BBC One.

The latest issue of Radio Times magazine is on sale now.

Interview: The latest issue of Radio Times magazine is on sale now

Interview: The latest issue of Radio Times magazine is on sale now

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here