Best solar states per capita 2012 compared to 2020 – CleanTechnica report

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Clean power

Published on October 4, 2020 |
par zachary shahan

October 4, 2020 by Zachary Shahan


After delving through an old spreadsheet to create a new report on key states of solar energy per capita, it occurred to me to compare the results for the first half of 2020 with the results for 2012, which is the last time I published such a report. before today. The results are quite fun to watch.

I will also include a graph at the bottom based on changes in total solar power capacity, not solar power capacity per capita. Also note that this report does not include all 50 states, unlike the previous one, because the data I had in 2012 did not include all 50 states. It only includes the top 25 states in terms of total solar power capacity.

As a final note before I get into the data, for this article, I’m including two charts for per capita rankings. The first graph is ordered by the 2012 rank. At the time, Arizona was # 1, Hawaii # 2, and Nevada # 3. The second graph is ordered by the 2020 rank. Arizona # 3. It’s not even on the podium in 2020 and Nevada is No.1. Again, for the full 2020 rankings, check out this report.

There are two big things that I find interesting in the two charts above and below. First of all, it’s encouraging to see how much per capita solar power capacity has grown in each of these states. (And, yes, I used different demographics for the two years.) Second, it’s quite fascinating to see how the ranking has changed. Here are 13 highlights from the top of the list:

  • Nevada moved from third place in 2012 to first place in 2020
  • California moved from 6th place in 2012 to 3rd place in 2020
  • North Carolina moved from 11th place in 2012 to 5th place in 2020
  • Vermont moved from 9th place in 2012 to 6th place in 2020
  • Utah came from off the charts at n ° 7!
  • Massachusetts moved from 10th place in 2012 to 9th place in 2020
  • Hawaii is in the same position (N ° 2)
  • Arizona moved from first place in 2012 to fourth place in 2020
  • New Jersey moved from 4th place in 2012 to 10th place in 2020
  • New Mexico moved from 5th place in 2012 to 8th place in 2020
  • Delaware moved from 7th place in 2012 to 23rd place in 2020
  • Colorado moved from 8th place in 2012 to 13th place in 2020
  • Maryland moved from 12th place in 2012 to 19th place in 2020

Before moving on to changes in total solar power capacity, I found out that the US Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) has some interesting “quick facts” about every state in the country, so let’s look at these bullet point lists of fun facts. for the top 5 states in terms of solar power capacity per capita for 2020.

Nevada

  • National ranking: 6th (10th in 2019).
  • State houses powered by solar energy: 652,128 homes.
  • Percentage of state electricity from solar: 15,26%.
  • Solar companies in the state: 84 (12 manufacturers, 39 installers / developers, 33 others).
  • Total solar investment in the state: $ 7,185.55 million.
  • Prices have fallen 38% over the last 5 years.
  • Growth projection: 4,332 MW over the next 5 years (ranked 5th).

Hawaii

  • National ranking: 15th (11th and 2019).
  • State houses powered by solar energy: 335,627 homes.
  • Percentage of state electricity from solar: 14,27%.
  • Solar companies in the state: 94 (3 manufacturers, 65 installers / developers, 26 others).
  • Total solar investment in the state: $ 3,579.91 million.
  • Prices have fallen 38% over the last 5 years.
  • Growth projection: 1,356 MW over the next 5 years (22nd rank).

California

  • National ranking: 1st (1st and 2019).
  • State houses powered by solar energy: 7,915,033 homes.
  • Percentage of state electricity from solar: 22,19%.
  • Solar companies in the state: 2006 (341 manufacturers, 951 installers / developers, 714 others).
  • Total solar investment in the state: $ 68,148.93 million.
  • Prices have fallen 38% over the last 5 years.
  • Growth projection: 15,208 MW over the next 5 years (ranked first).

Arizona

  • National ranking: 5th (4th and 2019).
  • State houses powered by solar energy: 768,164 homes.
  • Percentage of state electricity from solar: 7,56%.
  • Solar companies in the state: 307 (62 manufacturers, 142 installers / developers, 103 others).
  • Total solar investment in the state: $ 12,772.41 million.
  • Prices have fallen 38% over the last 5 years.
  • Growth projection: 2,260 MW over the next 5 years (ranked 9th).

North Carolina

  • National ranking: 2nd (6th in 2019).
  • State houses powered by solar energy: 777,493 homes.
  • Percentage of state electricity from solar: 6,59%.
  • Solar companies in the state: 216 (35 manufacturers, 88 installers / developers, 93 others).
  • Total solar investment in the state: $ 8,999.31 million.
  • Prices have fallen 38% over the last 5 years.
  • Growth projection: 3,623 MW over the next 5 years (ranked 7th).

If you look closely, you can also spot some interesting differences in 2012 compared to 2020 in terms of total solar power installations – aside from the fact that 2012’s total solar power capacity seems tiny.

North Carolina climbed the rankings from 7th to 2nd place. New Jersey had almost the opposite result, dropping from third to seventh. Likewise, Nevada moved from 4th to 6th place. This may come as a surprise, given that Nevada has moved up in the per capita rankings over the same period, dropping from 6th to 1st place. How is it possible? The reason is that the most populous states started installing more solar power from tiny base amounts in 2012, especially Florida, Texas, and North Carolina. Florida went from 13 to 4, Texas from 12 to 5, and North Carolina from 6 to 2.

Do you have any other takeaways from these charts and how has the U.S. solar market evolved over time?

Want to help increase the solar score in your state? If you are interested in solar and want to check out Tesla’s solar offerings, please feel free to use my referral code for $ 100 off the price of solar PV system: https://ts.la/zachary63404


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About the Author

Zachary Shahan tries to help society help itself one word at a time. He spends most of his time here CleanTechnica as a director, editor and CEO. Zach is recognized worldwide as an expert in electric vehicles, solar energy and energy storage. He has presented on cleantech at conferences in India, United Arab Emirates, Ukraine, Poland, Germany, Netherlands, United States, Canada and Curacao. Zach has long term investments in NIO [NIO], Tesla [TSLA]and Xpeng [XPEV]. But it does not (explicitly or implicitly) offer investment advice of any kind.



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