TSA Launches “Prohibited Items Week” to Minimize Snafus at Checkpoints

0
20


The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has launched its first “Prohibited Items Week” to help travelers understand what they cannot fly with.

This new awareness week initiative kicked off Monday, according to the TSA.

WE END THE IMPROVED SELECTION PROGRAM FOR THE ARRIVAL OF INTERNATIONAL TRAVELERS, CDC CONFIRMS

“Saint smokes, Batman!” We’re excited to kick off our very first Banned Items Week, ”the agency wrote in an article that showed a Batman-themed brass knuckle. “Follow through the week as we discuss common questions, crazy finds, and why we have certain rules!” ”

The TSA also shared a graph that shows which airports have discovered the most firearms brought in by passengers.

HAWAII OFFICIALS INTERCEPT WORSHIP AT AIRPORT, REROUTE GROUP RETURNS TO COLORADO

The top 10 airports that found the most firearms in 2019 were Hartsfield Jackson Atlanta International with 323 finds; Dallas Fort Worth International, 217; Denver International, 140; George Bush Intercontinental Houston, 138; Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, 132; Dallas Love Field, 103; Fort Lauderdale Hollywood International Airport, 100; Nashville International, 97; Orlando International, 96 and Tampa International, 87.

A total of 4,432 firearms were found in carry-on baggage at 278 airports that year, according to a report released by the TSA. Eighty-seven percent of the firearms discovered were loaded.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In a press release released last month, the agency noted that more firearms have been found at airports throughout the pandemic despite fewer passengers than last year.

And it’s not just prohibited weapons and fluids that air passengers have been caught traveling with. Last week, TSA officers at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport prevented corrupted lithium batteries from getting on a plane.

TSA EXPLOSIVES EXPERT CALLED TO EXAMINE “SUSPICIOUS” ITEM IN LUGGAGE: “MAY HAVE RESULTED IN A TRAGIC RESULT”

The passenger who had the modified power source in his carry-on baggage told officers they had built a wired solar panel with the batteries, however, TSA threw the device away because it was dangerous and unfit for air travel.

When preparing for future trips, the TSA has a detailed search engine to explain what can and cannot be packed for the trip.

CLICK HERE TO SUBSCRIBE TO OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here