See the results of the pandemic 6 months after the first case of coronavirus in New York

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NEW YORK CITY – empty streets. Restaurants and theaters closed. Mass unemployment. Masks everywhere. Overflowing hospitals. Trailers full of bodies. About 24,000 dead and a new normal emerges.

March 11 – this is the first entry on the official New York coronavirus death tally. This is a single recorded death, marked under the “confirmed” column.

Then two days passed without a single confirmed or even “probable” coronavirus death in the city, the data showed.

The respite did not last.

The deaths only climbed every day from March 14 – when there were three deaths – until they peaked on April 8.

On that, on the worst day of the pandemic in New York City, 813 people died from the virus, data shows.

Governor Andrew Cuomo, who held daily coronavirus briefings as the virus ravaged the city, called the moment the peak of the state’s coronavirus ‘mountain’.

“Doing this once in a lifetime is enough,” Cuomo said in a subsequent briefing in which he unveiled a scale model of the New York curve carved into a literal depiction of a mountain. “We don’t need to climb another mountain. ”

The epicenter

On March 20, Mayor Bill de Blasio declared New York as the “epicenter” of the coronavirus crisis.

It took several days for the city to publicly release data showing the toll of the virus on the boroughs and individual neighborhoods.

When officials finally did so on April 1, an almost unbelievable irony arose: The zip code covering Corona, Queens had the most positive tests in town with 947.

That’s right, Corona was the epicenter of the coronavirus epicenter.

The 11368 zip code covering Corona still has the city’s most positive tests, as well as deaths, the data shows.

Here are the top 10 postal codes and neighborhoods that tested positive, as of September 3:

  1. 11368 – Corona / North Corona – 5114 caisses
  2. 10467 – Allerton / Norwood / Pelham Parkway / Williamsbridge – 3 855 cas
  3. 11373 – Elmhurst – 3532 caisses
  4. 11219 – Borough Park – 3348 cas
  5. 10469 – Allerton / Baychester / Pelham Gardens / Williamsbridge – 3263 caisses
  6. 10468 – Fordham / Kingsbridge / University Heights – 3155 cas
  7. 11236 – Canarsie – 3020 cases
  8. 10314 – Bloomfield / Freshkills Park – 2 927 caisses
  9. 10456 – Claremont / Morrisania – 2877 caisses
  10. 11372 – Jackson Heights – 2829 caisses

The postal codes with the most deaths are slightly different:

  1. 11368 – Corona / North Corona – 446 dead
  2. 11691 – Edgemere / Far Rockaway – 374 morts
  3. 10469 – Allerton / Baychester / Pelham Gardens / Williamsbridge – 366 morts
  4. 10467 – Allerton / Norwood / Pelham Parkway / Williamsbridge – 329 morts
  5. 11226 – Flatbush / Prospect Lefferts Gardens – 301 morts
  6. 11235 – Brighton Beach / Manhattan Beach / Sheepshead Bay – 301 morts
  7. 11236 – Canarsie – 300 dead
  8. 11354 – Flushing / Murray Hill – 300 morts
  9. 11373 – Elmhurst – 297 morts
  10. 10456 – Claremont / Morrisania – 293 morts

The assessment after six months

De Blasio’s recent briefing on Thursday on the city’s daily coronavirus figures shows how much the situation has improved.

The city’s positive test rate – which reached 71.25% at its peak – now stands at 0.8%, de Blasio said.

His seven-day moving average of new coronavirus cases was 253, below the threshold of 500 cases that city health officials have defined as a warning sign, he said.

There have been 84 people admitted to hospital with symptoms of coronavirus, also below a red line of 200, he said.

And city officials did not count a single death on Wednesday, the last day for which data was available when this story was written. That number could be revised, but the city has not had a day where deaths from COVID-19 have exceeded 10 since July.

The city’s six-month toll stands at about 24,000 deaths, 57,000 hospitalizations and 231,000 cases in total.

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