Pianist, 80, gets emotional as he plays piano in new bionic gloves after years of disibility

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An internationally renowned pianist who has lost dexterity in his hands – and the ability to play his instrument – is finally able to perform again after being fitted with bionic gloves.

Returning to his passion after two decades of limitations was undoubtedly an emotional moment for the 80-year-old conductor, João Carlos Martins, who was unable to perform after decades of battles with injuries and injuries. diseases.

But earlier this year, the Brazilian maestro was fitted with a pair of neoprene-covered bionic gloves that help him move his fingers, and he’s now shared a poignant video of himself crying with joy as he performed Bach’s music.

Miraculous! 80-year-old pianist João Carlos Martins is able to perform again after injuries and illness rob him of his dexterity

The Brazilian maestro was fitted with a pair of neoprene-covered bionic gloves that help him move his fingers

He has now shared a poignant video of himself crying for joy as he performs music by Bach

Poignant: The Brazilian maestro was fitted with a pair of bionic gloves that help him move his fingers, and he has now shared a video of himself crying with joy as he performed Bach’s music

Moving: Clearly overwhelmed with emotion, he appears to be on the verge of tears throughout the performance, which he shared on Instagram

Moving: Clearly overwhelmed with emotion, he appears to be on the verge of tears throughout the performance, which he shared on Instagram

Martins is considered an incredibly skilled pianist, but he began to struggle with health problems in 1965 after suffering nerve damage to his arm from a football injury.

His problems worsened when he was assaulted in Bulgaria, his attacker hitting him on the head with a metal pipe.

He also battled degenerative disease and over the years has had 24 surgeries.

In 2000 he retired for most of the stage – he could only play slowly with his thumbs – and has worked as a conductor ever since.

But at the end of 2019, designer and innovator Ubiratã Bizarro Costa created bionic gloves for Martins. The gloves push his fingers up after pressing the keys.

While the new gloves were certainly a party thing, it took Martins a while to get used to them.

“I might not find the speed of the past. I don’t know what result I will get. I’m starting over like I’m an eight-year-old in apprenticeship, ”he told The Associated Press.

Reverse: Martins is considered an incredibly skilled pianist, but he began battling health problems in 1965 after suffering nerve damage to his arm from a football injury.

Reverse: Martins is considered an incredibly skilled pianist, but he began battling health problems in 1965 after suffering nerve damage to his arm from a football injury.

Magic: But at the end of 2019, designer and innovator Ubiratã Bizarro Costa created bionic gloves for Martins.  Gloves strike his fingers up after pressing the keys

Magic: but at the end of 2019, designer and innovator Ubiratã Bizarro Costa created bionic gloves for Martins. Gloves strike his fingers up after pressing the keys

Back!  In 2000, he mostly retired from performing - he could only play slowly with his thumbs - and has worked as a conductor ever since.  But now he can play again

Back! In 2000 he retired for most of the stage – he could only play slowly with his thumbs – and has worked as a conductor ever since. But now he can play again

But a new video shared on his Instagram account last week shows he’s doing pretty well.

In the clip, which has been viewed over 139,000 times on the platform and more on Reddit, Martins skillfully plays a number of Bach.

Visibly overwhelmed with emotion, he seems on the verge of tears throughout the performance.

“After I lost my tools, my hands and not being able to play the piano, it was if there was a corpse in my chest,” he told the AP in January.

“I know there is a long way to go,” he added in an Instagram post. “Only the future will show if I was successful in achieving my goals, but the thrill of being able to play something with the bionic gloves at home already makes me believe in a superior being.

He wrote on Instagram: 'The thrill of being able to play something with the bionic gloves at home already makes me believe in a higher being'

He wrote on Instagram: “The thrill of being able to play something with the bionic gloves at home already makes me believe in a superior being”

“I will keep pushing until this happens,” he said.  'I will not give up'

“I will keep pushing until this happens,” he said. ‘I will not give up’

WHO IS JOAO CARLOS MARTINS?

João Carlos Martins is a renowned Brazilian classical pianist and conductor, who has performed with leading orchestras in the United States, Europe and Brazil.

He first rose to fame with high praise and praise as a child prodigy.

He is considered one of the great interpreters of the music of Johann Sebastian Bach.

He was first a pianist who was with the principal pianist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

A degenerative brain disease, an arm injury sustained during a football match and an assault in Bulgaria deprived him of his dexterity.

The gloves took a long time to make, and the designer thought of several models that didn’t work.

He and Martins continued to collaborate and spent months testing prototypes before landing on the final version last December. The gloves cost only around 500 Brazilian reals (around $ 125) to build.

The pianist said that of the more than 100 gadgets he has received for his hands over the past 50 years, none have performed as well as these gloves, which he can even “tune” to suit different types of game.

In January, he admitted that he would sometimes find himself frustrated that his skills were not returning as quickly as he would like, so he had to keep practicing.

“Sometimes I try to play a fast game and I’m depressed because it’s just not happening yet,” he said.

He had also hoped to perform at Carnegie Hall in New York in October, when he was scheduled to conduct a concert in the historic venue – but understandably, live concerts in New York were canceled for the foreseeable future due to the pandemic.

“I will keep pushing until this happens,” he said. “I won’t give up.

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