Elvis Presley’s Graceland is disfigured by vandals who spray-painted “BLM” on the wall of the King’s Mansion

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Elvis Presley’s iconic Graceland Estate in Memphis was degraded by vandals overnight with “Black Lives Matter” and “Defund the Police” graffiti.

The protest slogans were painted in large black and orange print on the stone wall that surrounds the king’s mansion along Elvis Presley Boulevard, the Commercial Appeal reported.

Graceland, where Elvis lived for 20 years before his death in August 1977, also saw his wall marred by other popular activist phrases such as “Abolish ICE”, “Defund MPD” and “F *** Trump”.

The spray painted lettering covered thousands of tributes to Elvis written by fans who have visited the King’s House since it officially became a museum in 1982.

The vandalism was discovered by museum workers early Tuesday morning.

Elvis Presley’s iconic Graceland Estate in Memphis was disfigured by vandals overnight with “Black Lives Matter” and “Defund the Police” graffiti

Elvis Presley lived in Graceland for two decades before his death on August 16, 1977, at the age of 42.

Elvis Presley lived in Graceland for two decades before his death on August 16, 1977, at the age of 42.

The protest slogans were painted in large black and orange print on the stone wall that surrounds the King's Mansion along Elvis Presley Boulevard.

The protest slogans were painted in large black and orange print on the stone wall that surrounds the King’s Mansion along Elvis Presley Boulevard.

The spray painted lettering covered thousands of tributes to Elvis written by fans who have visited the King's House since it officially became a museum in 1982.

The spray painted lettering covered thousands of tributes to Elvis written by fans who have visited the King’s House since it officially became a museum in 1982

Elvis fans were outraged to see the monument disfigured.

“We were just passing this morning and we watched,” Alice Self told WMC5. “We just couldn’t believe it. We were simply amazed.

Elvis’ half-brother Bill Stanley also described how dismayed he was that someone was degrading the king’s house.

“It’s totally out of place,” Stanley said. “One of the saddest days of my life. I mean, other than the day Elvis passed away, this right here is right next to it.

Democratic State Representative Antonio Parkinson offered a different take on graffiti, in opposition to the collective voice of outrage, writing: “What is the real problem here? Every visitor who has come to Graceland has written on this wall and there have been no complaints. So really, that’s WHAT was written, not the fact that it was written.

A spokesperson for Graceland declined to comment on the vandalism. Worker-wielding pressure washers were seen removing graffiti from the wall mid-morning Tuesday.

But Elvis’ house wasn’t the only iconic monument vandalized in the city from Monday night to the wee hours of Tuesday morning.

The vandalism was discovered by museum workers early Tuesday morning.  Elvis fans were also shocked to see the monument degraded.

The vandalism was discovered by museum workers early Tuesday morning. Elvis fans were also shocked to see the monument degraded.

Workers wielding pressure washers were seen removing graffiti from the wall mid-morning Tuesday

Worker-wielding pressure washers were seen removing graffiti from the wall mid-morning Tuesday

The estate ¿located along Highway 51 South, known as Elvis Presley Boulevard ¿was opened to the public in 1982 and attracts approximately 600,000 visitors per year

The estate – located along Highway 51 South, known as Elvis Presley Boulevard – was opened to the public in 1982 and attracts approximately 600,000 visitors a year

Vandals also hit the Levitt Shell concert hall in Overton Park, spray painting scribbled obscenities, including “F *** TRUMP” and “F *** STRICKLAND”, a reference to Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, in more ‘EAT THE RICH’ ‘and other phrases.

The open-air amphitheater is where Elvis gave his first paid concert on July 30, 1954.

A Levitt Shell spokesperson said it was the sixth time this year that they had been vandalized.

The venue has already been significantly impacted financially by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and is currently battling a budget deficit of $ 800,000.

Since the building is a historic site, the cost of painting the Levitt Shell could be around $ 150,000, Memphis police said.

“That’s why it’s such a devastating situation to see her this morning,” said Natalie Wilson, executive director of Levitt Shell. ‘It’s getting worse.’

Wilson says she doesn’t tolerate graffiti, she hopes the historic space can be a place for the community to heal.

“Degrading our scene is not appropriate; however, we recognize their pain and want to tell our community “it’s time for conversations to be deeper, to be more productive and for change to happen with good communication,” Wilson said.

Vandals also hit the Levitt Shell concert hall in Overton Park, spray painting scribbled obscenities including

Vandals also hit the Levitt Shell concert hall in Overton Park, spray painting scribbled obscenities, including “F *** TRUMP” and “F *** STRICKLAND”, a reference to Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, in more “EAT THE RICH” ‘and other phrases

A Levitt Shell spokesperson said it was the sixth time this year that they had been vandalized.

A Levitt Shell spokesperson said it was the sixth time this year that they had been vandalized.

Also tagged overnight by vandals was the big ‘I [Heart] The Memphis mural on Cooper Avenue in York, where the same graffiti themes as “BLM”, “EAT THE RICH” and “DEFUND POLICE” have been scrawled all over.

The cases of vandalism were discovered on 901 Day, an unofficial celebration of Memphis culture that takes place on September 1 of each year.

Memphis Police are investigating the vandalism. Online, meanwhile, a debate over the identity of the vandals took place on social media, with some blaming left-wing “thugs” for the damage and others claiming “infiltrators” seeking to discredit the Black movement. Lives Matter were responsible for it.

Elvis Presley lived in Graceland for two decades before his death on August 16, 1977, at the age of 42.

The estate – located along Route 51 South, known as Elvis Presley Boulevard – was opened to the public in 1982 and attracts around 600,000 visitors a year.

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