Election software company Tyler Technologies reveals system hack: report

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Tyler Technologies, a software vendor whose products are used to display state and local election results, on Wednesday revealed a security breach involving its internal phone systems, according to a report.

The company said in an email to customers that it had suffered a “security incident involving unauthorized access to our internal telephony and information technology systems,” according to Reuters, which obtained a copy of the opinion. Tyler Technologies said an “unknown third party” was responsible for the breach.

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Representatives for Tyler Technologies could not be reached immediately for comment.

The software company’s website was offline Wednesday evening. In a notice to readers, Tyler Technologies said it is “aware of the problem” and “is working to get the site back online.”

Based in Plano, Texas, Tyler Technologies provides a variety of services to governments at the state and local levels, including tax software, emergency management systems and election-related products. Company software is used to display election results.

Company officials said they did not believe the system breach had an impact on Tyler’s customers.

Voting security has become a major source of concern ahead of the 2020 presidential election. Earlier this week, FBI and Department of Homeland Security officials warned that foreign hackers could attempt to spread false information about the election results.

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The agencies said hackers could try to “exploit the time needed to certify and announce election results” amid delays related to the coronavirus pandemic and an expected increase in mail ballots.

“National and local authorities typically need several days to several weeks to certify the final election results to ensure that every legally cast vote is counted accurately,” the agencies said. “The increased use of postal ballots due to COVID-19 protocols could leave officials with incomplete results on election night. “

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