Coronavirus has record number of young adults living with parents in the United States

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More young adults are living at home now than during the Great Depression, according to a Pew Research poll, with 52% reported living with one or both parents in July.

The number of young adults, aged 18 to 29, living at home is now 26.6 million, an increase of 2.6 million since the coronavirus pandemic swept the world in February, as only 47% lived with their parents.

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At the end of the Great Depression in 1940, 48% of young adults lived at home. Pew points out that there were probably more people living at home in the 1930s, but there is no data for this period.

The pandemic has hit younger adults particularly hard, as they have had to relocate due to college campus closures and job losses.

The youngest of adults, aged 18 to 24, accounted for 2.1 million of the 2.6 million who had to return home. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the employment rate for this Gen Z group, aged 16 to 24, was 46.7% in July, up from 56.2% in July 2019.

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The lack of job prospects has also taken its toll on the mental health of young Americans. A quarter of people between the ages of 18 and 24 have considered suicide this year due to the pandemic, according to a June survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Anxiety and depression have also exploded recently. The CDC found that the prevalence of anxiety disorders was three times higher among young Americans than in the second quarter of 2019 and that the prevalence of depression was about four times higher.

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