Zoom is down for thousands of users in the US and UK

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Zoom traveled through the United States and parts of the United Kingdom, leaving many people unable to work or go to school on Monday morning.

The blackout appears to affect major US cities, including New York, Washington DC and Philadelphia, as well as Los Angeles and San Francisco.

The biggest issues users reported were account login issues, server login errors, and blocking of conference attendance.

Reports began to surface after 7 a.m. ET and have since risen to over 12,000 on DownDetector at 9 a.m. ET.

Zoom told DailyMail.com in an email that the company is “currently investigating” the outage and will share updates if they arise.

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Zoom passed through the United States and parts of the United Kingdom, leaving many people unable to work or go to school on Monday morning.The blackout appears to hit major American cities including New York, Washington DC and Philadelphia .

“We have received reports from users unable to start and join Zoom meetings and webinars. We are currently investigating and will provide updates as we have them. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience, ”reads an email from a Zoom spokesperson.

Zoom’s status page shows that the company has identified the “issue preventing users from authenticating to the Zoom website (zoom.us) and starting and joining Zoom meetings and webinars, and we are working on a fix for this problem. “

And the latest update shares that Zoom is working on a fix for the problem.

DownDetector shows that the blackout primarily affects the Northeastern United States, with major cities like New York, Washington DC and Philadelphia.

Reports began to surface after 7 a.m. ET and have since risen to over 12,000 on DownDetector at 9 a.m. ET.  Zoom told DailyMail.com in an email that the company is `` currently investigating '' the outage and will share updates if they arise.

Reports began to surface after 7 a.m. ET and have since risen to over 12,000 on DownDetector at 9 a.m. ET. Zoom told DailyMail.com in an email that the company is “currently investigating” the outage and will share updates if they occur.

Some have flocked to Twitter to share their frustration and excitement that this is a 'digital snow day'

Some have flocked to Twitter to share their frustration and excitement that this is a “digital snow day”

With many Americans unable to communicate with staff on a Monday morning, August 24 also marks the first day of college for students.

With many Americans unable to communicate with staff on a Monday morning, August 24 also marks the first day of college for students.

Outage maps also show that users in Chicago, Atlanta, and Miami are having issues.

With many Americans unable to communicate with staff on a Monday morning, August 24 also marks the first day of college for students.

However, some have flocked to Twitter to share their frustration and excitement that this is a ‘digital snow day’.

Zoom was first launched in 2013, but recently gained popularity when the coronavirus pandemic began to spread across the world and force millions to return home.

The video conferencing app allowed people to continue chatting with loved ones, doing business and learning remotely while being locked out.

Zoom's status page shows that the company has identified the `` issue preventing users from authenticating to the Zoom website (zoom.us) and starting and joining Zoom meetings and webinars, and we are working on a fix for this problem.  But the outage affects many Americans who work from home and can't connect with staff

Zoom’s status page shows that the company has identified the “issue preventing users from authenticating to the Zoom website (zoom.us) and starting and joining Zoom meetings and webinars, and we are working on a fix for this problem. But the outage affects many Americans who work from home and can’t connect with staff

Although the platform has allowed the world to communicate during the pandemic, it has come under fire for a number of privacy and security concerns.

Internet trolls were making calls to Zoombomb posting pornographic and racist content while users held work conferences, online teaching sessions, and even anonymous alcohol meetings – leaving many wondering how good the service was. is secure.

However, Zoom CEO Eric Yuan spoke to Good Morning America in July to assure the public that privacy is of the utmost importance to the business and revealed features that will keep internet trolls at bay.

Yuan explained that users can create passwords for meetings, waiting rooms, and each session lock to protect their calls.

Digital break-ins on Zoom meetings take place across the United States as much of the country is locked out and forced to use online video conferencing to communicate in order to limit the spread of the coronavirus – over 245 million Americans are either self-isolated or mandated to stay at home.

Zoom was first launched in 2013, but recently gained popularity when the coronavirus pandemic began to spread across the world and force millions to return home.  Video conferencing app allowed people to continue chatting with loved ones, doing business and learning remotely while being locked out

Zoom was first launched in 2013, but recently gained popularity when the coronavirus pandemic began to spread across the world and force millions to return home. The video conferencing app allowed people to keep chatting with loved ones, doing business and learning remotely while remaining locked in

However, all these internet trolls have to do is search the internet for links to video conferences and grab calls to start their sneering harassment.

“There are things we can do every day to protect ourselves when using the platform,” he said.

You must understand the secure functionality of using Zoom. “

These features include creating a password for each meeting, so that only participants can enter.

Users can also create a group waiting room, allowing them to accommodate specific people and keep track of who is present.

And for added security, meetings can be locked after everyone is inside.

Many companies, including NASA, SpaceX, Bank of America, and Google, have banned staff from using the platform.

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