Victoria suffers her deadliest day, registering 41 deaths, 71 COVID-19 cases

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Victoria recorded its highest death toll to date with 41 deaths and 73 new cases of coronavirus on Monday.

The figures, confirmed by the Department of Health and Human Services on Monday, bring the state’s toll of the virus to 565 and the national total to 652.

Monday’s number includes 22 deaths in the weeks leading up to August 27, but they were only reported to Victoria Health by senior care facilities on Sunday.

That means 19 people died in the 24 hours leading up to Monday. The previous highest daily toll was 25 on August 17.

The death spike comes with 73 new cases of COVID-19 after Victoria recorded 114 new cases on Sunday and 11 deaths.

Victoria recorded its deadliest day with 41 deaths and 73 new coronavirus cases reported on Monday (pictured, residents wearing face masks are walking in Melbourne on Saturday)

The figures, confirmed by the Department of Health and Human Services on Monday, bring the state’s toll of the virus to 565 and the national total to 652

Prime Minister Daniel Andrews said on Sunday the number of cases was still too high to reverse the restrictions.

“These numbers of cases are too high for us to open them, and they are still too high for us to come up with a definitive plan,” he said.

“There will be a plan. It will come soon. But it will be something that we can be confident in, not something that will potentially make a few people happier.

The Victoria Police Association called on Monday for an extension of the powers of the state of emergency.

It comes as negotiations continue between the state government and MPs over what should happen when the current state of emergency provisions expire on September 13.

The Melburnians are subject to another fortnight of strict Fourth Leg restrictions, including a 8:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. curfew and Mr Andrews said the benefits of the first four weeks were starting to show.

Regional Victorians are subject to slightly less stringent stage three restrictions for the same period.

Last week, Mr Andrews sparked controversy when he announced that the government was planning to extend powers by 12 months to help fight the coronavirus.

The Victoria Police Association called on Monday for the extension of state of emergency powers (pictured: people crossing Southbank on Saturday)

The Victoria Police Association called on Monday for the extension of state of emergency powers (pictured: people crossing Southbank on Saturday)

Prime Minister Daniel Andrews said on Sunday the number of cases was still too high to reverse the restrictions

Prime Minister Daniel Andrews said on Sunday the number of cases was still too high to reverse the restrictions

Melbourne residents ignored the warnings and took advantage of the sunshine over the weekend (a resident pictured walking her dog on Saturday)

Melbourne residents ignored the warnings and took advantage of the sun over the weekend (a resident pictured walking her dog on Saturday)

With the opposition immediately saying they would not support the proposal, the government was forced to enter into negotiations with MPs.

There was talk of a compromise, with an extension reduced to six months, but there is no confirmation before Parliament returns on Tuesday.

On Monday, the Police Association, a powerful lobby group, released a statement on the matter.

“With 13 days from the current state of emergency, it is essential that Parliament act to maintain the framework that gives police and PSOs (public safety officers) the ability to help Victoria get out safely lockdown, ”he said.

“There can be no adequate plan for a return to some normalcy if the framework designed to ensure that this is done safely and gradually is removed.

“This question is above politics. The safety of our community and our members in this difficult time is too important.

Meanwhile, Deputy Chief Medical Officer Nick Coatsworth said on Monday morning it was difficult to see Melbourne come out of its Fourth Stage restrictions on September 13, given current numbers.

New cases fell to 94 on Saturday, but were back to 114 on Sunday before Monday’s drop to 73.

Police officers are seen outside Melbourne's Flinders Street station patrolling the city over the weekend

Police officers are seen outside Melbourne’s Flinders Street station patrolling the city over the weekend

Mr Andrews sparked controversy last week when he announced the government intended to extend powers by 12 months to help fight the coronavirus

Mr Andrews sparked controversy last week when he announced the government was planning to extend powers by 12 months to help fight the coronavirus

Restrictions in Melbourne are due to expire on September 13, but will be gradually reduced rather than removed altogether (pictured, the Melburnians out for a walk on Saturday)

Restrictions in Melbourne are due to expire on September 13, but will be gradually reduced rather than removed altogether (pictured, Melburnians go out for a walk on Saturday)

“It’s hard to see this happen,” Dr. Coatsworth told Nine Network.

“I think the numbers must be much lower than they are now.

Dr Coatsworth compared the state to NSW and Queensland, which see less than 10 new cases per day.

Mr Andrews said on Sunday he was convinced the second COVID-19 outbreak was under control.

“The contact tracing team is bigger than it ever was and will remain more important than the task,” he said.

“It will be a long, long struggle to keep this contained, but I think our staff are up to the task. “

He reminded residents that the brawl was far from over, after crowds visited St Kilda Beach over the weekend.

“No day at the beach is worth this.

“Let us not make any choice that would jeopardize all the progress we have made and which could render all the sacrifice we have made meaningless. We don’t want that, ”he said.

Restrictions in Melbourne are due to expire on September 13, but will be gradually reduced rather than removed altogether.

Health officials have indicated the recommendations for face masks could remain in place for several months.

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