The official portrait of Capt Sir Tom Moore unveiled at the Army Museum

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Alexander Chamberlin

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The oil painting was commissioned by the military and painted by former army officer Alexander Chamberlin


An official portrait of Captain Sir Tom Moore has been unveiled at the National Army Museum in London.

The oil painting of the 100-year-old army veteran who raised over £ 32million for NHS charities was created by artist Alexander Chamberlin.

It was hung in the museum as part of the commemorations to mark the 75th anniversary of VJ Day on Saturday.

Mr Chamberlin said Capt Sir Tom had been “incredibly accommodating” and was “extremely proud” to have painted it.

Capt Sir Tom had initially set out to raise £ 1,000 for NHS charities by repeatedly walking an 82ft (25m) loop of his Bedfordshire garden.

But he ultimately raised £ 32,794,701 from over 1.5 million supporters.

A former army officer himself, artist M. Chamberlin said he was “approached by an army colonel who saw the need to record [Capt Sir Tom’s] story in the language of portraiture… and he knew my work, because I had painted heads of state, politicians and pop stars.

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Alexander Chamberlin

Legend

The artist said it was “a huge privilege” to have been chosen to paint the official portrait


Speaking at the official unveiling of the work at the Chelsea Museum, he said: “It led to this, and I’m extremely proud to have been involved. ”

Mr Chamberlin said the meeting with the veteran had been “incredible”.

“He and his grandson… were incredibly accommodating and I think it was very exciting to put him in a place where he was most relaxed. “

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Getty Images

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Capt Sir Tom was knighted last month


He is pictured wearing his medals, regimental tie and even the gold Blue Peter badge awarded to him in recognition of his fundraising efforts.

Image copyright
Alexander Chamberlin

Legend

The framed portrait now hangs in the National Army Museum in London


Capt Sir Tom was stationed in Burma during World War II.

In a statement released by the museum, he said: “The victory over Japan is as important a part of our history as the victory in Europe and I hope it is truly never forgotten.

“It is wonderful to know that the portrait will be on display at the National Army Museum to connect the public to this story, and I hope it will continue to help tell the story of the British Army for decades, if not centuries. , to come up. “

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