Shania Twain Says Talking Is “More Difficult” Than Singing After Undergoing Open Throat Surgery

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Shania Twain, who contracted Lyme disease in 2003, has been open about her battle with dysphonia, a medical condition that causes voice paralysis.

While the 54-year-old country star feared she would never be able to sing again, due to complications from the unpredictable tick-borne illness, she eventually underwent “very frightening” open throat surgery to correct the condition.

In an interview with Loose Women on Monday, the Canadian icon revealed that the procedure stabilized “weak vocal cord function” with crutch-like facilities.

Open book: Shania Twain previously feared she would never be able to sing again, after undergoing open throat surgery when she contracted Lyme disease

The queen of country pop, who was bitten by a tick while riding a horse in a forest, revealed that the bacterial infection affected her voice.

“It took years to figure out what was affecting my voice. I would say probably a good seven years before a doctor could find out that this was nerve damage to my vocal cords directly caused by Lyme disease, ”she said.

She added, “You start to avoid talking on the phone, you start to avoid going to places with ambient noise where you have to speak above the volume of others. It’s very debilitating.

Hitmaker: The 54-year-old country star, who contracted the tick-borne disease in 2003, has been open about his battle with dysphonia, a medical condition that causes vocal paralysis;  seen in november

Hitmaker: The 54-year-old country star, who contracted the tick-borne disease in 2003, has been open about his battle with dysphonia, a medical condition that causes vocal paralysis; seen in november

“Our voices are such a big part of our personal expression and for a singer it’s devastating in so many ways,” the singer said, noting that it made her aware of herself.

She continued, “Until I understood why I was having a problem with my voice, there was not much I could do about it. “

In addition, the singer said it took “a long time” to believe that she would one day “be able to sing again”.

Fear: Speaking on Loose Women on Monday, the Canadian icon said: 'It's been a long time since I thought I would ever sing again'

Fear: Speaking Monday on Loose Women, the Canadian icon said: “It’s been a long time since I thought I’d never sing again”

“It took years to figure out what was affecting my voice.  I would say probably a good seven years before a doctor could find out this was nerve damage to my vocal cords directly caused by Lyme disease.

“It took years to figure out what was affecting my voice. I would say probably a good seven years before a doctor could find out this was nerve damage to my vocal cords directly caused by Lyme disease.

Since undergoing the risky operation, she has been able to return to singing and embrace her new sound.

“Fortunately, I persevered and I am making records again and doing concerts,” she said.

However, she noted that her “voice has changed” and that her speaking voice “is definitely the biggest effort.”

“It took a while and I thought I would have to accept at some point that I could never sing again,” she said in her last interview. photographed in 2018

“As you can hear I’m quite hoarse and sometimes I have to make adjustments while I’m talking. But singing because there is more projection is easier, ”said the Grammy winner.

“I have more power when I sing now. I have more character than I find and I love to sing again, speaking is the hardest challenge for me than singing but I will take it.

Throughout her convalescence, she relied on her husband Frédéric Thiébaud and her 19-year-old son Eja Lange, from a previous marriage.

Strong: The operation had permanent effects on her voice, but she adopted the new sound

Strong: The operation had permanent effects on her voice, but she adopted the new sound

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