Prime Minister touts France’s “breakthrough” – Taipei Times

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REPRESENTATIVE OFFICE:
Su Tseng-chang said people can see how Tsai Ing-wen has made diplomatic progress in Guam and France despite Chinese oppression

  • By Lee Hsin-fang and Jake Chung / reporter, with editor

Prime Minister Su Tseng-chang (蘇貞昌) yesterday hailed the planned creation of a representative office in Provence, France, as a “diplomatic breakthrough” and the result of President Tsai Ing-wen’s effective diplomatic policy (蔡英文).

Su made the comments at a ceremony at the Taipei Executive Yuan to award awards to officials who have performed well in mediation last year.

The Foreign Ministry announced on Tuesday the creation of the office in Aix-en-Provence in the south of France.

Photo: George Tsorng, Taipei Times

Taiwanese can see how Tsai has made significant diplomatic inroads in countries like Guam and France, despite Chinese oppression, Su said.

Last month, the ministry announced the reopening of its representative office in Guam, citing the growing strategic importance of the Pacific region and a strong partnership between Taiwan and the United States.

Taiwan’s efforts to prevent the spread of COVID-19 have also garnered praise internationally, Su said.

While the People’s Republic of China has failed to abide by the Sino-British Joint Declaration it signed with the UK on Hong Kong, Taiwan’s commitment to democracy and human rights is prompting also positive international attention, Su said.

Su paid tribute to Tsai’s “superb leadership” and “Taiwanese solidarity” for these achievements.

Regarding a dispute over the completion date of a third terminal at Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport, Su said the central government is working with all parties to ensure that obstacles are removed and to ensure completion. of the project.

The Ministry of Transport and Communications (MOTC) and Taoyuan International Airport Corp requested a postponement of the runway completion date until 2030, which Minister without portfolio Wu Tse-cheng (吳澤成) refused.

Wu said the company and MOTC should try to complete the project on time and only ask for a deadline if they can’t.

Media reports said the dispute hints at a split between central and local government policies, while a Taoyuan city councilor said the success of the project would pave the way for a 2024 presidential election led by Su or the mayor of Taoyuan, Cheng Wen-tsan (鄭文燦).

Reporters asked Su what he thought of former New Power Party (NPP) executive chairman Huang Kuo-chang (黃國昌) saying in a leaked recording that “Chairman Tsai would have been very nervous if I had been on the podium of the debate on the presidential election ”.

Tsai received popular support from all sectors of society, Su said, adding that the overwhelming results of the presidential and parliamentary elections in January were proof that people were comfortable with her at the helm.

The recording, dated October last year and released to the public on Sunday, was made as the NPP mulled over whether to nominate a presidential candidate or support Tsai.

The NPP faces a controversy over the recording, in which Huang is apparently heard berating Miaoli County Independent Councilor Tseng Wen-hsueh (曾 玟 學), who was a member of the party before announcing on Sunday that he was leaving him.

NPP caucus leader Chiu Hsien-chih (邱顯智) said yesterday that he intended to report the matter to the police, but did not answer phone calls from reporters.

Regardless of who made the unauthorized recording at a private reception, they tried to instill distrust within the party by only posting parts of it with doctored photos, Chiu wrote on Facebook.

The act was a blatant move to influence the NPP decision-making committee election and sought to create divisions in the party, he wrote.

Additional reporting by Wu Su-wei

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