More than one in 3 Americans will refuse a COVID-19 vaccine: survey

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One in three Americans will refuse to be vaccinated against the coronavirus if and when it becomes available, according to a new NPR / PBS NewsHour / Marist poll.

While 60% of respondents say they will get vaccinated if one becomes available, 35% say they will not, despite a global death toll from COVID-19 exceeding 760,000, according to the results published Friday. The remaining 5% say they are not sure.

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The results show Democrats were more likely to get the vaccine with 71% saying yes, compared to just 48% of Republicans who would. Comparatively, 61% of independents said they would get vaccinated.

Friday’s results align with a previous poll conducted by Fox News between Aug. 9 and 12, which found that 26% of Americans would not get a coronavirus vaccine. About 55% said they plan to do so, while 20% remain uncertain, according to the poll results.

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The Fox News poll also found that Democrats (66%) and Independents (54%) are more likely than Republicans (43%) to get the vaccine.

However, to varying degrees, the results also showed that the majority of Democrats (90%), Independents (67%) and Republicans (58%) preferred to demand masks to curb the transmission of the disease. The pandemic shut down much of the US economy, causing the worst postwar crisis.

The results reflect the power of the anti-vaccine movement, despite claims it spreads misinformation and puts followers at higher risk.

According to a 2018 study published in the National Institutes of Health, opposition to vaccines is “as old as vaccines themselves.”

Yet it has grown as the world rushes to create a vaccine against COVID-19, which has killed more than 167,000 Americans to date, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

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As anti-vaccine groups continue to urge parents to avoid vaccinating their children and promote their views on social media, an overwhelming majority of scientists and doctors firmly believe that “vaccines are both effective and safe, ”US Representative Adam Schiff said in Washington. Examiner.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said thousands of people died from diseases like whooping cough, polio, measles, Haemophilus influenzae and rubella each year before a vaccine was developed and was widely used. , thus lowering disease rates to the point where most of them almost left the United States

“Most vaccine-preventable diseases are spread from person to person. If a person in a community contracts an infectious disease, they can pass it on to others who are not immune, ”the CDC said. “But a person who is immune to a disease because they have been vaccinated cannot get that disease and cannot pass it on to others. The more people who are vaccinated, the less likely the disease is to spread. ”

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