Laura weakens on earth, still a major hurricane

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UPDATE 5 AMHurricane Laura made landfall this morning at 2 a.m. near Cameron, Louisiana as a Category 4 hurricane with winds at 150 mph.

After spending 3 hours above the earth, Laura has now fallen to 120 mph and will remain a hurricane for most of the day.

Laura is north on southwestern Louisiana. A catastrophic storm surge, extreme winds and flash floods continue in parts of Louisiana.


PREVIOUS COVER:UPDATE 2:00 AM

Hurricane Laura made landfall as a Category 4 hurricane just after 2 a.m. with winds at 150 mph near Cameron, Louisiana. It was the strongest hurricane to make landfall in Louisiana since 1856.


As of the 11:00 p.m. advisory, Hurricane Laura is maintaining its strength with winds now sustained at 150 mph, gusting to 185 mph. The storm continues to move towards the NNW at 15 mph, with pressure now stable or even slightly rising to 939 mb.

As of the 10 p.m. advisory, Hurricane Laura continues to gain strength with winds now sustained at 150 mph, gusting to 185 mph. The storm continues to move towards the NNW at 15 mph with pressure now dropping below 937 mb.

As of the 8 p.m. advisory, Hurricane Laura continues to gain strength with winds now sustained at 150 mph, gusting to 175 mph. The storm continues to move northwest at 15 mph, with pressure now dropping below 940 mb.

Major Hurricane Laura could be in the top 10 strongest hurricanes (based on wind speed) to make landfall in the United States.

As of the 5:00 p.m. advisory, Hurricane Laura continues to gain strength with winds now sustained at 145 mph, gusting to 175 mph. The storm continues to move northwest at 15 mph, with pressure now dropping below 950 Mb.

Storm surge warnings are active along the northern Gulf Coast with more than 9 feet of possible surge in some areas.

The map below represents the reasonable worst-case scenario of the storm surge potential. A big concern about the storm surge risk is how far inland she could go with Laura, in some cases the saltwater flooding caused by the Gulf tide could go over 30 miles inland from the coast.

Here’s how Laura’s storm surge potential compares to previous storms

While Laura is not hitting our area, it is time to prepare for hurricane season before a storm even forms. You do not know where to start? Our NBC2 First Alert 2020 Hurricane Guide can help, take a look here.

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