British Columbia cracked down on COVID-19 enforcement with fines for hosts and guests

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VANCOUVER – Landowners and organizers can be fined $ 2,000 for staging events found to violate public health orders in British Columbia under tougher enforcement measures announced Friday.

VANCOUVER – Landowners and organizers can be fined $ 2,000 for staging events known to violate public health orders in British Columbia under tougher enforcement measures announced Friday.Fines can be imposed for organizing a rally of more than 50 people, failing to keep contact details of everyone attending an event or inviting more than five people to a vacation rental, the security minister said audience Mike Farnworth at a press conference.

A party of less than 50 people is not necessarily legal, he added, since all other public health measures have yet to be followed.

“The police have their discretion, but if you have 38 people crammed into a kitchen and, you know, there’s no social distancing, then it’s clearly in violation of the order and the owner would be subject to a $ 2000 bill, ”he said.

Farnworth said ‘problematic’ customers could also face $ 200 bills for behavior that could include refusing to leave when asked or failing to follow COVID-19 safety plans at restaurants and other companies.

The province is recruiting liquor, cannabis and gaming inspectors, as well as conservation officers and investigators from WorkSafeBC, to help it issue tickets for the duration of the pandemic.

It is also working with local governments to revoke business and alcohol licenses if violated, Farnworth said.

“The province is in the process of building a comprehensive and integrated compliance and enforcement regime to end bad actors in every corner of British Columbia,” he said.

British Columbia is taking stronger action because the behavior of a small minority of “selfish individuals” puts vulnerable people at risk across the province, Farnworth said.

“We cannot let the bad decisions made by a few erode the progress we have made together. ”

Deputy provincial health official Dr Reka Gustafson said on Thursday the majority of the latest COVID-19 cases are still being detected in young adults.

Vancouver Coastal Health has launched a campaign in response to this trend, which includes tips for visiting restaurants, spending time with friends, playing recreational sports, going to the beach, taking road trips, and having sex. protected during the pandemic.

In a statement on Friday, the health authority’s chief medical officer, Dr Patricia Daly, said the reopening of restaurants and bars, where many young adults work, contributed to the rise.

But, she says, partying is another factor.

“We see the transmission happening in nightclubs in particular, but also in bars and restaurants, on boats and other indoor social environments,” Daly said in a statement.

“It’s the way people act and interact in these contexts that is problematic: sharing food and drinks, talking loudly and close together if there is background noise, and not social distancing between strangers,” especially if they have been drinking alcohol.

BC Ferries and TransLink, the Metro Vancouver transportation network, are also taking new steps to stop the spread of COVID-19. From Monday, non-medical masks or face masks will be mandatory for passengers on both transit services.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on August 21, 2020.

Brenna Owen, The Canadian Press

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