Destinations defined for travel quarantine exemptions at the end of the 14-day period

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Since Monday 8 June, anyone entering the UK from abroad – with the exception of Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man – must undergo a mandatory 14-day quarantine .The new rule has been unpopular with airlines, as well as those hoping to escape during the summer vacation.

However, they were given hope in the form of “air bridges”, which could allow people to travel freely between the United Kingdom and other specified countries.

What is an airlift?

Air bridges, also known as “movement corridors”, are essentially an agreement between two countries that allows them to remove mandatory quarantine when moving from one to the other.

For example, an air bridge between the UK and France would allow anyone in the UK to travel to France without isolation for two weeks upon arrival, and vice versa.

The government has said that the UK would only consider airlifting countries with low R rates – the measure of the coronavirus infection rate, and do not see a steady increase in infections.

Which countries will be exempt from quarantine?

About 60 countries are expected to be released from quarantine, a radical change in policy from previous plans, which suggested that the list would be much more limited.

Spain, France, Italy and Germany are all on the list, which will be published in full on Friday 3 July.

Most EU countries should be included, as well as long-haul destinations like Thailand, Sri Lanka, Australia and New Zealand.

However, it is believed that the United States, Russia and Brazil will remain on the “red” list – which means that there will always be a non-essential travel ban on these destinations.

Transportation Secretary Grant Schapps said Sky News: “There will be a list of more than 50 countries. If you add in the overseas territories, 60-something-or-other that will be announced later today.

“France, Germany, Italy and Spain will be on this list. It is really important that we have done this very carefully and prudently. The most important thing is to maintain the gains we have achieved. “

Greek beaches are only a few days away for British vacationers (Photo: Getty)

The list was drawn up using a “traffic light” system, with air bridges being granted to countries in the “green” and “orange” sections.

The system was designed by scientists and is based on how countries are handling the Covid-19 pandemic.

The list currently only applies to holidaymakers in England, with the decentralized administrations of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland to define their own approach.

When can I go on vacation?

The quarantine exemptions will take effect on Friday July 10.

For the vast majority of countries, you will not have to quarantine at one or the other end of the trip, because the agreements are reciprocal.

Mr. Schapps explained: The countries of [overall] This list means that when you get there, you will not have any restrictions unless they are on the whitelist, these are the countries where incidents are very low. We thought it was fair to include them.

“I take New Zealand as a good example, they have restrictions on your arrival, but we thought it was right to include them because people may want to come here from New Zealand and it’s not a particular threat to our hard-earned earnings.

“But in the middle countries, these are places where we have reciprocal agreements in place that if you go there or if you come here, the arrangements are the same in both directions. In other words, you don’t have to quarantine. “

“The government is effectively abandoning the transport corridors”

Paul Charles, spokesperson for the Quash Quarantine group of travel agencies said: of country.

“Once confirmed, we will again obtain the certainty in our sector which is absolutely necessary. Every day that goes by without confirmation means fewer bookings and more job losses.

“It is time for the government to level up with the British people on its travel policy, instead of going around in circles before making a decision.”

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