COVID-19 in Illinois updates: Here’s what’s happening this weekend

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Illinois reported 1,173 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 on Monday, bringing the state’s total number of cases to 162,748.

Public health officials also said that six other people died after contracting the virus. To date, 7,301 people have died in Illinois.

The state also reported 34,598 new COVID-19 tests in 24 hours, two days after setting a record with 46,099 tests.

The city will also limit all indoor fitness classes to a maximum of 10 people and prohibit personal services requiring the removal of masks, such as shaving and facials. The city is also asking apartment buildings to limit guests to five per unit.

Here’s what’s going on Monday regarding COVID-19 in the Chicago area and Illinois:

2:35 p.m .: 1,173 new known cases of COVID-19, 6 additional deaths

Illinois reported 1,173 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 on Monday, bringing the total number of cases to 162,748.

State health officials also said that six other people died after contracting the virus. So far, 7,301 people have died in Illinois.

The state also reported 34,598 new COVID-19 tests in 24 hours, two days after setting a record with 46,099 tests.

12:50 p.m .: Wisconsin’s largest teacher unions call for online school due to coronavirus pandemic

Teachers’ unions in five of Wisconsin’s largest school districts on Monday asked Governor Tony Evers and senior state health and education officials to keep schools closed earlier this year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The letter was signed by teachers’ union leaders in Milwaukee, Madison, Green Bay, Kenosha and Racine. It was sent to Evers, Secretary of the Department of Education Carolyn Stanford Taylor and Secretary of the Department of Health Services Andrea Palm.

11 a.m .: Residential buildings to set guest limit at 5 under new COVID-19 restrictions announced on Monday

Chicago is asking apartment buildings to limit the number of guests to five per unit as part of a new set of restrictions announced Monday morning in hopes of curbing the recent surge in COVID-19 cases.

The rule aims to avoid large gatherings and parties indoors and goes into effect Friday.

10:20 a.m .: Lightfoot bans indoor service at Chicago bars starting Friday

Chicago bars will no longer be allowed to serve alcohol indoors as of this Friday as part of a new effort to fight the coronavirus, Mayor Lori Lightfoot said.

The city will also limit all indoor fitness classes to a maximum of 10 people and prohibit personal services requiring the removal of masks, such as shaving and facials.

6 a.m .: COVID-19 has wreaked havoc in Illinois. Will the dead start over?

When the COVID-19 pandemic hit the United States, Illinois was one of the country’s first hotspots, fueling a death toll that remains among the highest in the country. Today, after sharp declines in daily deaths in Illinois and other hard-hit states, the Sun Belt is experiencing a massive increase. The daily mortality rate in Arizona is now as high as that in Illinois, after adjusting for the population.

The sharp rise in deaths in those southern and western states has added to growing unease in Illinois, where downward trends in cases and positive test results have started to rebound slightly.

Researchers say that while the latest data does not signal the need for an outright alarm, it does suggest the state, without changes, could be on the verge of another deadly wave.

6 a.m .: opioid overdoses skyrocket in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic; more potent drugs, rare treatment blamed

While opioid-related deaths have risen sharply so far this year, Chicago drug users are navigating the market with increasingly dangerous drugs and a changed landscape due to the societal impacts of COVID-19.

In Cook County, opioid overdose deaths this year are set to double last year’s numbers, with the public health crisis long-simmering, while Chicago also faces an increase in armed violence and continues to fight the COVID-19 pandemic.

The deaths in the three overlapping crises have a disproportionate impact on the black community, highlighting racial inequalities in health care, housing, education and other areas. The toll is particularly heavy on the West Side of the city, where since the end of March, nearly 80 people have died in a few postal codes.

Meanwhile, experts say street drugs are increasingly scaled back with more dangerous substances, increasing the risk of fatal overdose at a time when the pandemic has led to the closure of some clinics and a reduction in available social services. .

6 a.m .: Drowning risk has rarely been higher as Chicago suffers a pandemic and one of its hottest summers

When public pools and beaches closed, the key to surviving a sweltering summer in Chicago during the pandemic was simple for those who could afford it: buying a swimming pool.

For the rest of us, options are few and far between, and for the most part illegal, like swimming in sometimes dangerous waters where there are no lifeguards.

And it’s increasingly worrisome for security experts, who say the risk of drowning has rarely been higher when Chicago suffers from one of its hottest summers.

“There are a lot of factors coming together here that worries us about the potential increase in the number of drownings,” said Connie Harvey, National Director of Aquatic Centennial Initiatives for the American Red Cross.

“There are fewer places to swim that are protected by lifeguards, but people will still go into the water,” she says. “It’s a hot summer, they’re going to find places to swim.”

6 a.m .: Sticky notes on the bathroom door and wipes near the coffee maker. Employees find new rules when they return to the office.

Some Chicago offices are starting to reopen with a limited number of employees who volunteer to return. In doing so, companies are testing new safety policies to protect workers from a health crisis that shows few signs of decline. The first steps, from practical safeguards to original solutions, offer a glimpse of what office life might look like after companies bring their employees back.

Hand sanitizer is everywhere and some offices are blocked off to promote social distancing while working. Conference rooms are often prohibited, as are dining rooms. There are signs on almost all walls, doors and TV screens reminding workers of the new rules.

Steps that might have seemed intrusive, such as daily temperature checks and health assessments, are often required before employees can walk through the front door.

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