Australia may restrict return of citizens from abroad due to coronavirus outbreak: PM – National

0
75


Australia is likely to slow the return of its citizens from abroad, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said on Wednesday as he struggles with a new epidemic of coronavirus that has led him to isolate his second most populous state.The border between Victoria and New South Wales, the busiest in the country, was closed overnight and about 4.9 million residents of the Victorian capital of Melbourne will return to a partial lock at midnight after an outbreak COVID-19 cases in the city.

Read more:

Australian border companies prepare for chaos before coronavirus shutdown

“The rest of the country knows that the sacrifice you are going through right now is not only for you and your own family, but for the Australian community as a whole,” Morrison said in a televised press conference.

The story continues under advertising

“I can imagine the frustration … we have no control over the virus as such, but we do have control over how we react.”

With Victoria closing putting pressure on other states, Morrison said he would submit a proposal to the national cabinet created to deal with the pandemic on Friday, seeking to slow the return of Australian citizens and permanent residents by reducing the number of repatriation flights. The two groups are the only arrivals allowed since Australia closed its international border in March.










Coronavirus: Australia reports worst COVID-19 outbreak in 2 months


Coronavirus: Australia reports worst COVID-19 outbreak in 2 months

Neighboring New Zealand has already taken this step, announcing on Tuesday that its national airline will not accept new incoming bookings for three weeks to reduce the burden of overflowing quarantine facilities.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]
In Australia, the public is increasingly concerned about the security breaches that led returnees to spread the virus, despite quarantine upon arrival. Victoria has started an investigation into how the state has gone from eradicating the virus to soaring infection rates.

The story continues under advertising

The state reported 134 new infections within 24 hours to Wednesday morning, down from yesterday’s record 191 but well above the small single-digit daily increases in other states and territories.

Read more:

Australia to close border between two largest states as coronavirus cases increase

Of the new cases, 75 were occupants of nine social housing towers that have been placed under the most stringent foreclosure in the country to date. About 3,000 residents were banned from leaving the buildings, which are in police custody, for five days. All residents are tested for COVID-19.

Border control

On the border with New South Wales, cars accumulated on both sides, as police checkpoints caused delays of more than an hour for drivers. The state line is very popular with daily commuters who live and work on either side.

“I got a permit but with all the checks my journey was greatly delayed,” Reuters telephone operator Amanda Cohn, who crosses the border from her home in NSW to the hospital, told Reuters by telephone on a daily basis. Victorian where she works. “Many others have to pass and they don’t have permits.”

Read more:

Australia suffers from worst recession in 30 years as coronavirus recovery begins

The story continues under advertising

Authorities hastily set up a system to issue travel permits to a select group, mainly commuters in border towns, but a website created to issue passes crashed shortly after its release. launch Tuesday evening. Officials reassured that regular commuters could instead show residential and employment documents.

The only other internal border of Victoria, with South Australia, has been closed since mid-March.

In Melbourne, new foreclosure measures will take effect at midnight for at least six weeks, closing cafes, bars, restaurants and gymnasiums and confining residents to their homes, except for essentials.










COVID-19 lessons from New Zealand and Australia


COVID-19 lessons from New Zealand and Australia

The Australian economy will experience an economic impact of up to A $ 1 billion ($ 700 million) a week following the border closure and the Melbourne foreclosure, said federal treasurer Josh Frydenberg.

Nationally, Australia has reported approximately 9,000 cases of COVID-19 and 106 deaths from the virus, a level that remains low compared to other countries.

The story continues under advertising

(Report by Byron Kaye, Colin Packham and Renju Jose; edited by Jane Wardell)

See the link ยป




LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here