American Airlines will fly at full capacity – only 3 u.s. airlines have blocked the middle seat on domestic flights

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has been the subject of scrutiny for his decision not to block the seats intermediaries on flights in the name of the prevention of the spread of coronavirus – but many other airlines have adopted the same position.
The carrier announced last week that as of Wednesday the 1st of July, he resumed the booking of its flights at full capacity.

Previously, the airline had stated that it would limit its flights to 85% of its capacity, and would block some seats to ensure social distancing aboard its aircraft. In the future, passengers will be notified if their flight will be crowded and will have the opportunity to change your flight free of charge.
In addition to American, other airlines that do put a cap on not the ability of flight or do not block seats include United
UAL,
-0,46%,
Allegiant
ALGT,
-0,84%,
Mind
SAVE,
0.39 units% and Sun Country.

This decision has attracted criticism from public health experts. “We do not believe that this is the right message,” said Tuesday to Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “It is really important that individuals, [they’re in] a bus or a train or an airplane, are a social distancing to the extent possible. “

Delta is one of the few u.s. airlines to block seats intermediaries on its flights in order to promote a greater social distance on board of the aircraft during the outbreak of coronavirus.

Getty Images

During this same hearing, Anthony Fauci, director of the national Institute of allergy and infectious diseases, said that the change of policy in American ” is something of a concern “. Fauci and Redfield both made comments in response to a question from senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Who has asked why the government was not working to stop this kind of activity”.
A spokesman for American Airlines said that the company was “unwavering” in its commitment to safety. “We know that our customers trust us to secure every aspect of their journey, and we are committed to do,” said the spokesman in an e-mail.
“We have several layers of protection in place for those who travel with us, including the cover faces required, cleaning procedures improved, and a checklist of symptoms COVID-19 before the flight – and we offer additional flexibility to customers to change their travel plans,” added the spokesperson.


Three other airlines have decided to reduce their capacity: Alaska Airlines, Frontier Airlines and Southwest.

American Airlines is not alone in its position. In fact, only three airlines based in the United States – Delta
DAL,
-1,24%,
hawaiian
HA,
-1,92%

and JetBlue
JBLU,
-2,11%

– have blocked completely the seats of the environment on their domestic flights, significantly reducing the capacity of their devices.
Three other airlines have decided to reduce their capacity.
Alaska Airlines
ALK,
-1,54%

blocks seats “selected.”
Frontier Airlines block 20 to its seating capacity per flight to give customers the opportunity to buy a seat that will be more distant socially. On one of the planes typical of the airline, a seat on the five, has a central seat secured to the side of them. “It is confirmed that we take on each flight – and not a scenario we will do our best “, ” said Jennifer de la Cruz, director of corporate communications of Frontier, at MarketWatch in an e-mail.
Southwest Airlines
LUV,
-1,08%

is committed to ensuring that none of its flights will be reserved for more than two-thirds until 30 September. The southwest does not assign seats, however, the seats in the middle remain open, but passengers are encouraged to take as much distance as possible during boarding.
But experts have also questioned the effectiveness of the social distance on the planes as an approach to curb the transmission of the virus that causes the COVID-19 on the aircraft. To reduce the likelihood of exposure to a very low level, “you need to reduce the density of the seats so low that it would be impossible to operate an aircraft in an economic way,” said Byron Jones, an engineer and professor at Kansas State University, at a conference of law. a hearing last week before the Sub-committee of the House of representatives on space and aeronautics.

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